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Online Courses

Have you heard of the new PATH Intl. Autism Spectrum Disorder & EAAT Online Course yet?  We are thrilled with the development of this three-week course because of focused learning objectives to inform professionals how to create effective and enjoyable lessons for all ages and levels in equine-assisted activities and therapies (EAAT). The course includes a feature presentation by a physician with the University of Colorado School of Medicine Children’s Hospital Colorado and offers many other resources to advance your instructor ‘tool box.’  PATH Intl. Member Center’s report that ASD participants are the most prevalent individuals receiving services at programs. You can expect this course to deliver on key characteristics of the disorder, appropriate communication techniques and behavior management strategies. We hope you join us in a session very soon.

Over 450 PATH Intl. Member Centers are currently serving youth-at-risk. For instructors serving youth that have experienced trauma, abuse and neglect, this course aims to describe how trauma may affect EAAT participants and guide instructors on how to develop a trauma-informed approach to EAAT.
 
Instructor Training for PATH International Equine Services for Heroes®
This course offers instructors an understanding of basic military culture, terminology and common reasons that veterans and service members seek out EAAT. Learners will develop mindful communication skills, center policies and processes for participant assessment, planning and identifying precautions and contraindications.
 
This four-week mentor training course meets the requirements to become an official PATH Intl. Mentor. Quality mentorship is a key component to achieving any level or discipline of certification. This skill development program has been created in response to the need for a formalized education process to enhance the skills of those who mentor. The objective is to increase the number of qualified mentors available to instructors-in-training and to provide current PATH Intl. Certified Professionals with a continuing education opportunity while enhancing personal observation, evaluation and feedback skills.
 
PATH Intl. Spinal Cord Injury, Paralysis & EAAT
This course offers instructors an understanding of SCI conditions and how to apply this knowledge to the development of safe and effective EAAT lesson plans. Course curriculum will focus on integrating new ideas for offering a participant-centered approach to planning and facilitating EAAT.
 
PATH Intl. Standards Course
The PATH Intl. Standards Course provides guidance to certified professionals and centers to strive toward best practices and is currently a required course(either in person or online-formerly the CAT Course) for center accreditation and PATH Intl. certifications. This interactive, multi-module course is designed to help the learner gain a thorough understanding of the importance and application of the PATH Intl. Standards.
 
Conference Recordings 
Addressing PTSD in Military Veterans Using Equine Facilitated Psychotherapy 
Advanced Veteran Lesson Plans for Extreme Trail Obstacles 
Effects of Therapeutic Riding on Functioning and Quality of Life in Veterans 
From Statistics to Stability: Changing the Trajectory for Youth in Foster Care 
Immersion Summer Program 
Lungeing: Unmounted Activity Curriculum 
Promoting Independence at All Riding Levels 
Speech: It Starts at the Hips and Ends at the Lips 
The Right Fit: Volunteer Considerations for Veterans Programs 
Understanding the Mental Health of Horses
 
Webinars 
Adaptive Tack 
Cerebral Palsy: The Basics 
Cultural Considerations of Using Signs In EAAT 
Equine-Assisted Learning Webinar Series 
Mounted Games 
PATH Intl. Business Planning for EAAT 
PATH Intl. Strategic Planning for EAAT
Take the Reins -- Volunteer Screening, a free guest webinar by PATH Intl. Sponsor CastleBranch
 

Free Webinars Through Carlisle Academy

Click here for three webinars intended for coaches and athletes as a basis of Para-Equestrian Sport education, provided on behalf of the USEF/USPEA International Para-Equestrian Dressage Centers of Excellence.

PATH Intl. Mentor Training Online Course

Welcome to the PATH Intl. Mentor Training Online Course! We are glad you are joining us. During this Mentor Training Course, you will explore and apply principles and practices for effective mentoring.

Click here to purchase.

Course Description

This four-week Mentor Training Course meets the requirements to become an official PATH Intl. Mentor. Quality mentorship is a key component to achieving any level or discipline of certification. This skill development program has been created in response to the need for a formalized education process to enhance the skills of those who mentor. The objective is to increase the number of qualified mentors available to instructors in training and to provide current PATH Intl. Certified Professionals with a continuing education opportunity while enhancing personal observation, evaluation and feedback skills.
This course will be taught online through CourseWebs, our Learning Management System. Learners should expect to spend 3-5 hours per week for this course, some weeks may require more time than others. There is one module of coursework for each week of the course. Each module contains instruction, activities and discussion questions.
This course will meet 12 hours of continuing education requirements for PATH Intl. Certified Instructors. Successful completion of all course activities and exams is required to receive the CEU’s for the course and receive the PATH Intl. Mentor designation.

Learning Objectives

After the completion of this course, PATH Intl. Certified Professionals will be able to:

  • Demonstrate and apply knowledge of the certification process and PATH Intl. Standards
  • Display diplomacy with mentee, volunteers and participants
  • Formulate effective communication methods with mentee
  • Demonstrate conflict resolution strategies
  • Employ realistic expectations for mentee
  • Provide appropriate feedback to mentee

Prerequisites

Current PATH Intl. Certified Professional
Required Materials: PATH Intl. Standards for Certification and Accreditation manual

Technical Requirements

Our learning management system is CourseWebs. To access the LMS, learners will need an internet connection and an internet browser with Java enabled (Mac users must use Firefox, or other Mac-compatible browser as Safari is not compatible with CourseWebs).

In addition, learners should be able to:

  • Create and save MS Word documents
  • Find basic resources on the internet
  • Create and organize files & folders on your computer
  • Send, receive and manage email

Accessibility Statement

PATH Intl. is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for all course participants in accordance with federal guidelines. If you have a disability, use assistive technology, or need accommodations to fully access a course, please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Someone from our PATH Intl. staff will contact you to discuss your needs.

Plagiarism

Plagiarism, the passing off of others’ words or ideas as your own, is unacceptable in this course. Learners are expected to formulate your own ideas in the discussion posts and not simply repeat what another student has already said.

Coursework/Participation

All coursework should be completed and submitted successfully by the posted deadlines to receive credit for this course. Acceptance of late coursework is at the discretion of your course instructor and will only be allowed under extenuating circumstances. All coursework will be scored as Complete (C) or Incomplete (I).

Learners will need to access the course three to four times per week to complete online reading, exams, discussion board posts, activities and submit assignments.

A one-time request for a transfer to a later section of the course may be allowed. Note that completed coursework will not transfer and the transfer is subject to an administrative fee of $50.

PATH Intl. Standards Course

Learning PATH Intl. Standards is vital for PATH Intl. Certified Professionals, instructors-in-training, center representatives, site visitors, program administrators and anyone interested in learning the highest safety standards and industry best practices for equine-assisted activities and therapies (EAAT). This course will provide you with an overview of how the standards are organized and how they come together to holistically support EAAT programing. You can expect to dedicate approximately 6 hours of coursework.

Click here to purchase the online standards course and exam. 

Last year in November BraveHearts Therapeutic Riding and Educational Center, a PATH Intl. Premier Accredited Center in Harvard, IL, began mentoring veterans to become PATH Intl. Certified Registered Instructors so veterans can teach other veterans riding while providing much needed peer to peer support. The mentorship program was led by PATH Intl. Certified Master Instructor Meggan Hill-McQueeney and assisted by PATH Intl. Certified Registered Instructor Paddy McKevitt and PATH Intl. Certified Registered Instructor and USMC veteran Nick Montijo. The process began with three all-intensive days that focused on the PATH Intl. instructor certification process, enhancing riding and horsemanship skills and overall knowledge of working with people with diagnoses. Following the three-day all-intensive course, the veterans were given instructions to complete their Phase 1 requirements of the certification along with gaining as much exposure as possible to riding lessons and teaching opportunities at BraveHearts.

The veterans independently held group meetings to work with one another taking practice tests and reviewing course preparations. Once Phase 1 was completed, the group quickly moved to Phase 2 and began obtaining their teaching hours.  In January, the group met again for their second in house training consisting of an all day training creating lesson plans, riding and teaching one another. This gave the group time to reflect on possible lesson plans for the certification, strengthen their teaching and evaluate what they needed to work on with their riding. The group met with Meggan in March again to review progress, questions and more critiquing.  Meggan also used a lot of the teachings of Barb Schulte to help mentally prepare the veterans for the riding and teaching components and the specific skill sets Meggan teaches for performance enhancement strategies.    

In March, Mary Apper (Navy), Fred Busby (USMC) and Ron Hathaway(Air Force) along with Trecia Rodgers (Army) from ROCK in TX, participated in a week-long preparation, workshop and certification  course. Arriving to the farm the four veterans moved in and spent long hours each day to perfect lesson plans and their riding pattern prior to the OSWC. The OSWC was led by faculty  Marny Mansfield and Kathy Glew. The two and a half day workshop was also attended by 4 additional veterans (Ernest Coleman, Mitchell Hedlund, Greg Machalinski and Jeff Murphy) whom are currently preparing for Phase 1 and hope to certify later this year.  After the two and a half days of the workshop concluded, Mary, Fred, Ron and Trecia rode their pattern and each taught two veteran participants for their testing. We are proud to announced that all four veterans passed both components for their certification and are now PATH Intl. Registered Level Instructors.

The entire training and workshop was at no cost to the veterans due to funding received by the Milne Family Foundation, which consisted of funding for 15 veterans to receive their PATH Intl. Registered Level Instructor Certification within three years (2015-2017). The planning, preparation and training for the OSWC took much time and effort on BraveHearts, PATH as well as the two facilitators who helped to structure the course to be the best schedule for the veterans. A lot was taken into consideration of the process. The preparation was well worth it to watch all four veterans pass their certification and continue to move forward with their horsemanship. The veterans all came from different horsemanship backgrounds--two having been riding throughout their life and two veterans who have only been riding within the last year.

One veteran shared this quote with us to wrap up his experience, “With BraveHearts help, I am now a PATH Therapeutic Riding Instructor. BraveHearts has had the courage to see potential in me when I felt I had nothing to give. They have taught me to live in the moment and not dwell on my mistakes and shortcomings…I am proud I can now give back to others in need and I hope I can help others recognize their endless potential...I have gone from wishing I had died to a person that is looking for the next challenge no matter what it is. More than that, I want to help others face their fears and defeat those fears. For the first time in my life I BELIEVE I can do anything. BraveHearts has saved my life and I will be forever grateful.”

In April 2016, BraveHearts held the first training course for the next round of veterans who will be certifying later this year. These veterans consist of BraveHearts’s veterans Ernest Coleman, Mitchell Hedlund, Greg Machalinski and Jeff Murphy as well as Brenda-Lee Anderson from Rainier in WA and Brandon Horning from Colorado Therapeutic Riding Center in CO. These veterans are in the early stages of Phase 1 and will continue to develop with the guidance of Meggan and Paddy along with fellow veterans Mary, Fred, Ron and Nick.  BraveHearts is excited to watch these instructors to continue to develop and pursue their passion of helping fellow veterans and people with disabilities and reach their unlimited potential.  

PATH Intl. Instructor Training Spinal Cord Injuries, Paralysis and EAAT Online Course

Welcome

This three-week PATH Intl. education course will provide focused education on conditions related to spinal cord injuries (SCI) and paralysis, and to discuss ideas to determine the best practices for providing Equine Assisted Activities and Therapies (EAAT) to individuals with physical and/or emotional challenges related to living with SCI and paralysis.

Learning Objectives

As result of taking this course, learners will be able to:
1. Determine eligibility of EAAT applicants.
2. Apply understanding of SCI conditions to the development of safe and effective lesson plans.
3. Develop a participant-centered approach to planning and facilitation of EAAT.
4. Improve current safety plans and/or policies at your facility.
5. Integrate new ideas for accommodations at your facility.
6. Understand the purpose and benefits of EAATs and exercises for participants with a SCI.
7. Understand conditions, symptoms, and mobility limitations to select the appropriate equine, equipment, and lesson activities for each participant.
8. Appropriately decline applicants who do not qualify for EAAT or dismiss participants who are no longer eligible.

Course Schedule

This is a three-week online course. Individuals can expect to complete 4-6 hours of coursework per week. Each unit will consist of required readings, videos, discussion topics and graded assignments.

Attendance/Participation

You are expected to attend and actively participate in each of the outlined weekly activities in order to receive credit for the course. Each assignment and activity is graded, with a minimum score required to pass the course. There are no live or synchronous activities in this course, all coursework is done on your own time, following the deadlines provided for each week.

Prerequisites

None

Intended Audience

PATH Intl. Credentialed Professionals, PATH Intl. Instructor-in-Training or other EAAT professional/instructor

Course Dates

This course runs monthly, beginning March 1, 2016. To see course dates and to register, please click here.

Course Pricing

$299
PATH Intl. Member Discount Price: $199

Required Materials

Required reading assignments have been compiled and are used throughout the course. You are expected to read the required readings prior to completing assignments. Additional optional resources may also be provided at the discretion of individual course instructors.

Required Materials: 2016 PATH Intl. Standards for Certification and Accreditation manual 
(Purchase through the store or members may download a copy from the members only page)

Technical Requirements

• Our learning management system is CourseWebs. To access the LMS, you will need an internet connection and an internet browser with Java enabled.

In addition, you should be able to:
• Create and save MS Word documents
• Find basic resources on the internet
• Create and organize files & folders on your computer
• Send, receive and manage email

Withdrawal/Transfer Policy

Course participants may withdraw from a course up to 10 days prior to the start of the course. Withdrawals less than 10 days prior to the start of the course will incur a $50 administrative fee.

Accessibility Statement

PATH Intl. is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for all course participants in accordance with federal guidelines. If you have a disability, use assistive technology, or need accommodations to fully access a course, please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Someone from our PATH Intl. staff will contact you to discuss your needs.

DSCF8710PATH Intl. faculty are experienced and practicing professionals with the capability of effectively promoting learning within individual courses and programs. Our faculty all have significant experience in fields related to the courses they facilitate. They are selected through an assessment process and then are oriented to mission and organizational structure of PATH Intl.

PATH Intl. faculty are carefully assessed and selected for teaching ability. Minimum qualifications are listed below.

All PATH Intl. faculty are required to meet or exceed minimum requirements to achieve faculty status. These include, but are not limited to:

• Recent, substantive and relevant experience that combines theory and practice

• Awareness of and respect for adult learning theory and practice

• Participation in and successful completion of a faculty assessment

• Completion of formal PATH Intl. faculty training

The following documents are the result of the work done by the PATH Intl. Faculty Development Task Force over the past couple of years. The goal of the task force has been to clarify and standardize PATH Intl. faculty processes and procedures among all disciplines and to improve the overall quality of education provided by ensuring that all PATH Intl. faculty exhibit excellence.

All processes updated June 2017

ESMHL Faculty Process
Driving Faculty Process
Mentor Training Faculty Process
Online Faculty Process
Registered Faculty Process
Standards Course Faculty Process
Vaulting Faculty Process

Faculty Requirements
Faculty Application

Faculty Evaluator Training Application

Faculty Professional Development Form

List of PATH Intl. Faculty

Standards Course Faculty

Marsha Anderson, Equul Access
Kim Berggren, Cheff Therapeutic Riding Center
Octavia Brown, Therapeutic Riding at Centenary
Sharon Butler
Melissa Conner, Renew Therapeutic Riding Center
Cutler Joan, EQUEST
Mary Gwinner, Born 2 Be Therapeutic Equestrian Center
Elizabeth Kellogg, EQUEST

Ainslie Kraeck, San Diego Hippotherapy
Patricia McCowan
Teresa Morris, Fieldstone Farm Therapeutic Riding Center
Jane Muir
Gail Pace, EQUEST
ClarePalmquist, Project ASTRIDE
Lynn Petr, Shangri-La Therapeutic Academy of Riding
Kristen Sanders, Shangri-La Therapeutic Academy of Riding 

Lesley Shear, Circle of Hope Therapeutic Riding, Inc.
Kitty Stalsburg, High Hopes Therapeutic Riding, Inc.
Stefani Viktora-Anderson, PATH Intl.
Sandy Webster, Gaits of Change Consulting
Michelle Weed, Horse Rhythm Foundation
Lindsey Wood 

* This list is updated annually. Some faculty members may also be PATH Intl. Evaluators.

Certification Faculty/Evaluators

color coded faculty list

Mentor Training Faculty

Liz Adams
Marsha Anderson
Mary Jo Beckman
Tina Bennett
Kim Berggren (Henning)
Karen Bocksel
Corie Brooks
Octavia Brown
Patti Coyle 

Joelle Devlin
Margo Dewkett
Kathy Glew
Heather Hernandez
Lili Kellogg
Terri Knauer
Ainslie Kraeck
Tasha Malinchoc-Federinko
Marny Mansfield
Jenny Nell
Amy Newman
Gail Pace
Lynn Petr
Lorrie Renker
Kitty Stalsburg
Jacqueline Tiley
Pebbles Turbeville
Sandy Webster

Online Course Faculty

Erin Bartlett: ASD, Mentor, SCI
Nancy Beers: ES4H
Joelle Devlin: ASD, Mentor

Michele Kane: ES4H, Mentor
Hannah LaPointe: ES4H, Mentor, SCI
Allison Lewis: ASD, Mentor, SCI
Lissa Lutz: ASD, ES4H, Mentor
Sarah Reega:  ASD, ES4H, Mentor
Michelle Weed: ES4H, Mentor 

KEY:
ASD = PATH Intl. Autism Spectrum Disorder and EAAT Online Course
ES4H = Instructor Training for PATH International Equine Services for Heroes®
Mentor = PATH Intl. Mentor Training Online Course
SCI = PATH Intl. Spinal Cord Injury, Paralysis & EAAT

 

Conference Session Recordings

Webinars

Courses and Exams

Publications

 

 

Conference Recordings

heads-upHeads Up! We’re Growing and That Means Change!

2014 Conference Audio Recording

Understand the impact of growth for a center and how to apply a systems perspective by making decisions based on data instead of opinions or emotions.

More Information

horse-cultureHow Horse Culture Affects Sustainability and Risk Management

2014 Conference Audio Recording

How you act, think and talk about horses affects sustainability, risk management and assessment practices. Take a deeper look at anthropomorphism and equine welfare principles for shaping and maintaining your program’s horse culture.

More Information

right-team-right-nowThe Right Team, Right Now

2014 Conference Audio Recording

Investing in effective performance management techniques and staff development allows even broken teams to rebuild a solid foundation of exceptional service, team cohesion and professional growth.

More Information

when-to-buildWhen to Build? An Interactive Conversation about Capital Campaigns and Building Fundraising Capacity to Sustain Beyond the Build

2014 Conference Audio Recording

Assess your organization’s strengths and growth readiness. Capital campaigns can make or break and organization, and there are key factors that determine your readiness to grow and sustain that growth.

More Information


Webinars

business-planningBusiness Planning for EAAT

Learn the basic elements of a business plan, how to use financial data to your advantage, understand depreciation, capital budgeting, profit and loss by program and much more. Most importantly, learn how a business plan can be one of your most useful tools and how to easily put one together.

More Information

 

strategic-planningStrategic Planning for EAAT

Does your center have a strategic plan? Is it current? Do you review it annually? Learn the basic elements of a strategic plan-vision, mission, goals and tactics. Learn how to do an easy environmental scan using organizational strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. Strategic plans provide an organization with a roadmap to future success and provide focus for leadership.

More Information

 

Courses & Exams

Center Accreditation Course and Exam (CAT Course)

This course helps to prepare PATH International Center Members for an accreditation visit and to serve as an introduction or review of the PATH International accreditation program.  It will also help those prepare for instructor certification.  

More Information

Online Volunteer Course

This course is designed for individuals who are interested in serving as volunteers at one or more of our 866 independently operated PATH Intl. Member Centers and is intended to provide a general audience with a broad perspective of many aspects of serving as a volunteer at a PATH Intl. Member Center. Completing this course should offer the prospective volunteer an excellent starting point and an understanding of what awaits them at a PATH Intl. Member Center.

More Information 

 

 Publications

start-an-eaat-centerHow to Start an EAAT Center

Printed booklet or PDF download

This startup packet is a basic information source.  PATH Intl. Member Centers can be established on a small scale, but to grow and succeed, a proper foundation, which includes best business practices and industry standards, must be laid. This packet includes practical advice, job descriptions, copies of PATH Intl.’s most recent membership publications and other information you will find useful.  

PDF Download - More Information
Printed Booklet - More Information

 

Equine-Facilitated Psychotherapy Manual

You have a successful PATH Intl. program and are exploring to expand your services to your community. Implementing equine-facilitated psychotherapy services into your existing program is a great way to start. This EFP manual will assist you in developing the structures and procedures for a safe and professional EFP program.

CD Manual - More Information
PDF Download - More Information 

 

Equine-Facilitated Learning Manual

CD Manual - More Information
PDF Download - More Information

 

HRH Volunteer Video

Volunteering at a therapeutic riding center, this 24 minute training covers volunteer arrival, mounting, leading, side-walking, dismounting and emergency procedures following the PATH Intl. Standards for Certification and Accreditation.

More Information

PATH Intl. Standards for Certification and Accreditation

Printed Manual - More Information
CD - More Information
Download - More Information (PATH Intl. Members only. Sign-in to PATH Intl. account required)

 
 

Introducing Online Courses Provided by PATH Intl.

Watch this short video introduction to the new wave of education available from PATH Intl! 

Instructor Training for PATH International Equine Services for Heroes®

Learning Outcomes

As a result of this course, learners will be able to:

  • Describe the benefits of EAAT for veteran and service member (VSM) participants
  • Recognize military terminology and conditions presented by VSM
  • Demonstrate mindful communication skills and terminology appropriate for working with VSM participants  
  • Develop an orientation procedure for VSM participants, staff, and volunteers
  • Understand the components of matching a VSM participant within the program, and identify when the program is not recommended for a VSM participant
  • Develop a process for participant assessment, session planning, and stable management to implement equine services for VSM at your facility

Course Schedule

This is a 3-week online course. Individuals can expect to complete 4-6 hours of coursework per week. Each unit/week will consist of a unit presentation, required readings, discussion topics and assignments. Click here for the full course schedule.

Week 1:
Offering services to veteran participants requires that instructors see their role and the program outcomes in a way that can support the VSM in the ways they will benefit from most.

Week 2:
Planning and preparation are instrumental in providing EAAT for VSM. The planning and preparation invested will be evident in the day to day operation of the EAAT programs. The addition of a new participant demographic can be an opportunity to refine or improve your current program operations and practices. The information in Unit 2 can help to identify program weaknesses that can be addressed prior to serving VSM participants to increase the likelihood they will keep coming back.

Week 3:
During the facilitation of EAAT for VSM, help them learn and grow in sessions tailored to their personal interests and needs. This unit will review the various aspects of facilitating sessions with the VSM participant in mind. 

Prerequisites

None

Course Dates

Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for course availability.

Course Pricing

$249 PATH Intl. Members / $349 non-members
Limited time only: $199 promotional PATH Intl. Member Rate

Withdrawal/Transfer Policy:
Course participants may withdraw from a course up to 10 days prior to the start of the course. Withdrawals less than 10 days prior to the start of the course will incur a $50 administrative fee.

Technical Requirements
Our learning management system (LMS) is CourseWebs. To access the LMS, you will need an Internet connection and an Internet browser with Java enabled. Mac users must use Firefox, or other Mac-compatible browser as Safari is not compatible with CourseWebs.

In addition, you should be able to:

  • Create and save MS Word documents
  • Find basic resources on the Internet
  • Create and organize files and folders on your computer
  • Send, receive and manage email

Articles and Stories About PATH International Equine Services for Heroes (formerly known as PATH International Horses for Heroes)

April 2012: "Horses for Heroes: Finding Support on Stable Ground" in Fayette Woman

February 2011: PATH International Horses for Heroes at Central Kentucky Riding for the Handicapped

February, 2011: PATH International Horses for Heroes Photo Essay by Martha McNiel at DreamPower

November 2010. This video was filmed in October 2010 and was shown on KTEH-TV in California the week before Thanksgiving. Jeremiah Ridgeway, a US Army Calvary Scout with the 10th Mountain Division, served 15 months in combat in Afghanistan. He is now a civilian working with the VA and with DreamPower Horsemanship (San Martin, CA) PATH International Horses for Heroes.

March/April 2010: U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs magazine, Vanguard, highlights the story "High in the Saddle" (pages 16-19)

Fall 2009: PATH International Strides Magazine story, "Heroes on Horses: Partnering With Veteran's Groups"

Spring 2009: PATH International Strides Magazine story, "Riding Rehab"

May 11, 2008: Haverill Gazette story, "Shaking the Horrors of War"

Spring 2008: PATH International Strides Magazine story, "Serving the Older Veteran"

July 4, 2007: CBS Evening News Story "The Horses of Arlington"

April 2007: North American Riding for the Handicapped Association, Inc. Establishes "Horses for Heroes" Program (press release)

Fall 2006: PATH International Strides Magazine story, "I Will Never Leave a Fallen Comrade"

The Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.) values quality mentorship and believes it is instrumental to the success of instructor candidates completing any level or discipline of certification.

This workshop was created as a mentoring skill development program in response to the need for formalized education to enhance the skills of those mentoring instructor candidates. The mentor training can be completed as either an in-person or online course.

The mentor training is available to anyone who would like to take it; you simply have to be a PATH Intl. member. The training can be highly beneficial for program directors in order to begin or enhance a mentor program at their center. Mentor programs can be used as a source of income for your center.

It is the responsibility of course participants/mentors to maintain documentation and supply proof of their mentor training course certificate of completion. PATH Intl. does not retain copies of certificates of completion issued for any PATH Intl. workshops or trainings.

Click on a mentor's name to download his or her information. All pdfs will open in a new window. Safari users, alt-click to open dialog window.

Alabama

Deborah Manasco

Alaska

Chelsea Sharpless

Arizona

Jan Grise

Saebra Pipoly

Jan Quain

California

Barbara Auerbach

Joan Blank

Donna Brandt

Corie Brooks

Karen Crampton

Tish Dipman

Brenda Falco

Lisa Grijalva

Gloria Hamblin

Sara Jones

Landa Keirstead

Robin Kilcoyne

Kris Lawson

Miguel Sarasa

Allie Sarnataro

Lauren Tutill

Colorado

Heather Cotterman

Jody Howard

Adriana Livingstone

Sarah Jean Reega

Sharon Tiraschi

Connecticut

Marie Aparo

Sarah Carlson

Patti Coyle

Imanol Echeverria

Cindy Joyce

Carolyn McEvitt

Laura Moya

Jeanna Pellino

Florida

Bonnie Blackmon

Robin Bramson

Marla Bowman

Arron Haggart

Danielle Johnson

Sarah Lloyd

Roger Meadows

Pamela Morrison

Angela Reddish

Stacey Spence

Nichole VandenBossche

Pat Vannetta

 

Georgia

Idaho

Hugh Blue

Lindsey Jameson

Melissa Jacobe

Brienne Mabry

Lisa Scales

Illinois

Tricia Boyd

Jennifer Buckley

Nicole DeLarm

Julie Gavin

Jamie Herwald

Rebecca Hoelker

Mary Illing

Windy Kopecky

Sharon Mason

Danielle McKenna

Margaret Muller

Sarah Newland

Sally Stewart

Indiana

Amanda Bubb

Elizabeth Coit

Cindy Linsenbardt

Libby Marks-Shepard

Colleen McNamara

Carrie Perry

Deborah Usher

Iowa

Susan Bock

Beverly Downey

Kansas

Bonnie Bruns

Svetlana Hruda

Dionne Newton

Kentucky

Asa Raymond

Louisiana

Mareike Budo

Victoria Eiland

Maine

Sarah Armentrout

Kristen McGraw

Maryland

Debbi Bly

Sherri Braxton

Elizabeth (Beth) Cole

Doria Fleisher

Nancy Heller

Kelly Rodgers

Katelyn Roe

Lesley Shear

Ashley Smith-Ragans

Katie Spohn-Streett

Erin Teigen

Sandy Winter

 

 

Massachusetts

Liz Adams

Patti Lessard

Janet Renard

Michigan

Tina Bennett

Kim Berggren

Melissa Conner

Tamara Homnick

Shaina Strikwerda

Susan Tucker

Minnesota

Marsha Anderson

Michelle Anderson

Joan Berg

Linda Finn

Kathy Jo Hanson

Michelle Haury

Elizabeth Micheel

Judy Peterson

Mississippi

Clare Hanson

Missouri

Rosemary Erganian

Elizabeth Johnson

Montana

Dana Eklund

Maggee Harrison

Shari Morin-Degel

Rochelle Smith

Nevada

Alissa Burns

Barbara Chastain

Amanda Judge

Michelle Weed

New Hampshire

Liz Devine

Lauren Kochakian

Danielle Martin

Allison McCully

Kristen McGraw

Sherry Paplaskas

New Jersey

Sue Adams

Octavia Brown

Liz Carlson

Emily Caton

Melanie Dominko-Richards

Kathy Brennan Hart

Laurie Kelley

Tara Mahoney

Dina Parrello

Kimberly Ann Pohubka

Susan Radcliffe

New Mexico

Mike Raupp

Twuana Raupp

New York

Lindsay Alberts

Denise Avolio

Karen Bocksel

Laura Corsun

Antoinette DeGruccio

Alison Dodge

Ellen Kerrigan Dry

Annie Follansbee

Elizabeth Fortes

Astrid Harrison

Debi Houliares

Marny Mansfield

Suzanne Marquard

Katie McGowan

Stacy Miller

Lynn Peters

Lori Piccirilli

Katie Posner

Lorrie Renker

Sam Schaubroeck

Marie Varvaro

North Carolina

Holly Confroy

Willow Goodman

Janna Griggs

Juliette Holden

Jean Martin

Sherri Moore

Ohio

Kellie Bowers

Beth Compton

Linda Hauck

Jennifer King

Alexis McDonald

Teresa Morris

Sarah Potts

Fran Rowland

Karen Sanchez

Carey Smith-Wilson

Jessica Wolgast

Oklahoma

Mindy Hole

Rachel Royston

Judy Smith

Oregon

Michelle Bianchi

Trish Broersma

Paulina Cohen

Beverley Haywood

Debbie Holmes

Patricia Nelson

 

 

Pennsylvania

Kathryn Brown

Laurie Bryceland

Martha Dubensky

Maire Guggenheim

Marcia Laver

Katy (Katherine) Mead

Lin Podolinsky

Vera Ann Remes

Nancy Van Wyk

Puerto Rico

Carlos Méndez

South Carolina

Denise Bishop

Amanda Gerald

Beth Wood

Tennessee

Tina Carpenter

Catherine Dolson

Alice Duva

Bonnie Garner

Martha Georgeson

Brittany Halstead

Susan Lutz

Lynn Petr

Sherri Russell

Kristen Sanders

Lindsey Wood

Texas

Cynthia Amodei

Jessica Antash

Cherlyn Becker

Laura Buzbee

Amy Causey

Joelle Devlin

Margo Dewkett

Jen Donahue

Naomi George

Kathy Harbaugh

Heather Hernandez

Anna MacPherson

Erin Malia

Brenda McCall

Tracy McCarty

Rebecca Mercer

Teresa Miller

Shelby Nicoletti

Dorothy O'Neal

Shelby Price

Trecia Rodgers

Emilie Ross

Utah

Marci Bender

Vermont

Kristin Mason

Susan Miller

Virginia

Mary Jo Beckman

Kathy Blaine

Sommer Boss

Cindy Jo Daniel

Stefanie Green

Sue Ellen Hargadon

Carol Ivey

Kendall Lecker

Jamie Link

Jo Anne Miller

Heather Payne

Kate Robbins

Corliss Wallingford

Donna Wilson

Carol Wood Young

Marjorie Youngs

Washington

Caitlin Beazely

Sandra Reid Boe

Mary Teresa Bron

Kelly Chaplin

Cheryl Corrigan

Jill McCary

Heather Nesse

Rohana Swihart

Washington DC

Karen Brittle

Anna Schwiebert

West Virginia

Patty Harman

Carol Petitto

Wisconsin

Joan Berg

Dena Duncan

Shannon Gher

Ken Giske

Katie Luessenhop

Jennifer Pape

Angela Poster

Monica Schaefer

Kim Sievers

Wyoming

Leigh Flack

Meggan Hill-McQueeney

Australia

Jindalee

Tracy Sturtevant

Canada

British Columbia

Karen Tanchak

Ontario

Janine Langley

Japan

Tomoko Shichino

Michael Tokuzawa

Singapore

 

Spain

 

 

AHAlogo-smAmerican Hippotherapy Association, Inc. - promotes the use of the movement of the horse as a treatment strategy in physical, occupational and speech-language therapy sessions for people living with disabilities
 

HandH_smHorses & Humans Research Foundation - facilitates universal understanding and appreciation of the significant influence of horses on humans.

ELCR_NL_banner_sm

Equine Land Conservation Resource - The Equine Land conservation Resource works with individuals, equestrian and conservation organizations and equine-based corporations to save land for horses and preserve our industry and way of life.

UnwantedHorse_smUnwanted Horse Coalition - to reduce the number of unwanted horses and to improve their welfare through education and the efforts of organizations committed to the health, safety, and responsible care and disposition of these horses.

FRDI_sm

Federation of Riding for the Disabled International - to facilitate the worldwide collaboration between organizations and individuals whose objectives are philantropic, scientific and educational in the field of equine assisted activities.

equisearchEquiSearch.com works closely with award-winning equine magazines to deliver the content horse owners care about: tips on riding and training, authoritative information on horse care, the latest horse sports and industry news, plus sweepstakes and active online forums.

chaCertified Horsemanship Association - To promote excellence in safety and education for the benefit of the entire horse industry. This is accomplished by certifying instructors, accrediting equine facilities and publishing educational resources. dsicover_horses_logo

DiscoverHorses.com  introduces people to the wonderful world of horses and encourages them to become involved. The site is the product of a unique partnership of the Equine Network, American Quarter Horse Association, United States Equestrian Federation and the Kentucky Horse Park.

   

Interested in joining PATH Intl. as an industry partner? Contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call her at (303) 452-1212, ext. 117.

(813) 264-3890

Look for signs leading you to the center.

The Bakas Equestrian Center is located off Race Track Road, behind the Highland Park Subdivision. Please drive cautiously through the subdivision; there are many young children and we like to keep good relationships with our neighbors!

From I-275

•    Take the Bearss Exit & head west
•    Go past Dale Mabry Hwy. (at this intersection Bearss becomes Ehrlich)
•    Stay on Ehrlich to Gunn Hwy. (landmark – Sickles High School)
•    Turn right on Gunn (north) & go to the 2nd light (South Mobley Rd. — landmark – McDonald’s)
•    Turn left on South Mobley & go past Ed Radice Park
•    Continue west to Race Track Rd and turn left.
•    Go past the first light and take your next left onto Ecclesia Dr.
•    Stay on Ecclesia and go past the playground and Model Home, the road will turn into a one way street *Take the next left which is Canopy Drive
•    Go until you see the Bronze statue of a horse and go right. This is Whisper Lake trail.  Follow that road to back to Bakas which is the barn with the clock tower.

From the Veterans Expressway

•    Take the Ehrlich Exit & head west about 0.5 miles
•    At Gunn Hwy. (landmark – Sickles High School) turn right
•    Go to the 2nd light (South Mobley Rd. — landmark – McDonald’s)
•    Turn left on South Mobley & go past Ed Radice Park
•    Continue west to Race Track Rd and turn left.
•    Go past the first light and take your next left onto Ecclesia Dr.
•    Stay on Ecclesia and go past the playground and Model Home, the road will turn into a one way street
•    Take the next left which is Canopy Drive
•    Go until you see a bronze horse statue on your right and turn here, this is Whisper Lake Trail.  Follow this road all the way back to the Barn with the Clock Tower.

PATH-Intl-higher-ed-logo-smPremier Accredited Center Higher Education FAQs

I want to work with our local college/university to offer classes at our center:

What is the best way to approach the college/university?

The best way for a PATH Intl. Premier Accredited Center to approach a college/uniersity is to call the program development office to find out if there is an existing program, e.g., Equine Science. Be prepared to suggest that equine programs be held at the center. The center may offer an Intro to Therapeutic Riding class targeted to the students attending the school, and this would start building a student population that may be interested in additional education. The center may also offer to attend job fairs and other venues to discuss the equine-assisted activities and therapies industry.

Who do I speak with at the college/university?

The center would speak with someone in the program department or with new program development. The school should be able to provide the center with the appropriate person to contact and their contact information.

What resources are available to help me get ready to start a program?

The PATH Intl. website has resources available explaining the PATH Intl. Higher Education Membership, application booklet and certification criteria. PATH Intl. staff can also help to connect premier accredited centers to experts in the field. Centers that choose to offer an introductory class may also discuss this option with the school. The school may be able to provide additional specialty faculty under an adjunct faculty heading.

What will be the PAC's role in working with a college/university?

Following the membership guidelines, the center would provide instruction and assist with practicum. Centers that wish to enter into a partnership with a PATH Intl. Level III Higher Education member would hold certification at their center.

What will be the time required?

The time required for the center is dependent on the program offered, an introductory course or an integrated course with the college/university. It is recommended to start slow and build the program, ensuring success for both the PAC and the college/university. Premier accredited centers can joint ogether to offer the practicum/teaching hours for students. Both the PAC and the college/university will benefit with participants who have a vested interest in the program.

PATH-Intl-higher-ed-logo-smPATH Intl. Higher Education and Certification for Students

Choosing to attend a PATH Intl. Higher Education Member college or university allows students the opportunity to complete the PATH Intl. certification process along with other areas of study. The preparation of instructor candidates to become safe, knowledgeable and effective therapeutic riding instructors consistent with the levels of PATH Intl. Instructor Certification is incorporated into coursework offered through the college/university, including but not limited to varying levels of equine management, horsemanship, riding instruction, teaching methodologies and disabilities.

What college/university's membership level mean to me?

A PATH Intl. Higher Education Member may offer:

  • Curriculum related to equine-asssisted activities and therapies (EAAT) governed by PATH Intl. but do not offer PATH Intl. certifications.
  • Curriculum that meet criteria to prepare students for PATH Intl. certification; however, the certification itself is completed at a PATH Intl. Member Center event. The college/university either provides through its own facility or works in conjunction with a PATH Intl. Premier Accredited Center classes on campus (including virtual/distance learning campuses) and at hands-on labs.
  • Curriculum that meet criteria to prepare students for PATH Intl. certification including the certification itself. The college/university either provides through its own facility or works in conjunction with a PATH Intl. Premier Accredited Center to offer classes on campus (including virtual/distance learning campuses) and at hands-on labs.

What benefits do I receive as a PATh Intl. Higher Education Student Member?

Students attending a Level II or III PATH Intl. Higher Education Member college/university receive a student membership designating them as PATH Intl. Higher Education Student Members, access to PATH Intl. online courses and training material.

How do I enroll at or find out more about the individual PATH Intl. Higher Education Members?

Contact the PATH Intl. Higher Education member directly. Click here for a list of PATH Intl. Higher Education members.

Do I receive a PATH Intl. Instructor Certification?

  • Students attending a PATH Intl. Higher Education Member college/university that offers the education requirements for certification will meet the criteria to attend a PATH Intl. On-site Certification at any PATH Intl. Premier Accredited Center. Additional costs for the certification will apply.
  • Students attending a PATH Intl. Higher Education Member college/university that offers certification as part of the curriculum will graduate with a PATH Intl. Instructor certification at either the registered or advanced level.

Is there any additional cost associated with the program?

Depending on the college/university's requirements, there is a fee for educational material required and the certification. Consult the college/university directly for specific fees.

horse-boy-laughingPATH Intl. centers are able to provide a variety of recreational programs that reflect personal preferences and choices for the person with developmental delays. Learning horseback riding skills includes leisure and recreational activities alone and with others, riding socially with others, taking turns, extending the time of the riding lesson and expanding one's repertoire of skills towards independent riding. Some persons may choose to compete in programs such as the Special Olympics.

Briana-Shea-center-staff smPeople who have a visual impairment are able to learn to ride or drive independently and compete in equestrian events. People with visual impairments may participate as part of a vaulting team. Strategies to help people with visual impairments include use of intercom systems with the instructors, learning to count steps/strides, or auditory markers in the arena. These strategies are frequently used at PATH Intl. centers and both instructors and horses are able to accommodate and accept the rider or driver’s differences.

horse-nuzzle-childPeople who have had a spinal cord injury may have varied levels of impairments from sensory loss to quadriplegia. A complete spinal cord injury above T-6 is a contraindication for riding, but would not necessarily prevent a client’s participation in other types of equine programs such as driving and unmounted activities. Many people who have had a spinal cord injury may participate in therapeutic riding lessons, carriage driving or may choose an equine assisted therapy program to address challenges with trunk control or coping with their injury.

Lechner, Kakebeeke, Hegemann, and Baumberger (2007) conducted research to determine the effect of hippotherapy on spasticity and mental well-being of persons with spinal cord injury (SCI).Spasticity was measured by the Ashworth Scale and subjects’ self-rating on a visual analogue scale. Well-being was measured by subjects’ self-report on the well-being scale Befindlichkeits-Skala of von Zerssen. The researchers found that only the effect of hippotherapy reached significance for clinically rated spasticity compared with the control condition (without intervention). Immediate improvements in the subjects’ mental well-being were detected only after hippotherapy.

Participants with spina bifida may participate in equine-assisted activities or therapies at a PATH Intl. center. Prior to participation, the client’s doctor will need to carefully screen the participant for concerns such as tethered cord, hydromyelia or Chiari II malformation. Any changes in neurological status must be carefully monitored during participation in riding programs. Learning to ride or a horse may be an empowering experience and allow someone with limited mobility from spina bifida to experience a greater freedom on the back of a horse.

People with muscular dystrophy may participate in programs at PATH Intl. centers to keep active while engaging in an enjoyable activity. Riders may start out more independent, but may need more support as their disease progresses. Riding lessons may be tailored to the abilities and stamina of the rider. The PATH Intl. instructor may support their transition to a non-mounted program such as driving or a hippotherapy program as their needs change. This flexibility helps the person with muscular dystrophy stay active and engaged while coping with changes in their abilities.

white-horse-adultTherapeutic riding can be a great source of exercise in which people with multiple sclerosis may choose to participate. They can participate in riding within their limits of strength and energy and still enjoy an active recreational activity or sport. Riding may help people with multiple sclerosis stay limber and active.

Silkwood-Sherer and Warmbier (2007) studied the effects of hippotherapy on postural stability in persons with multiple sclerosis. They found that the group receiving hippotherapy (9 adults) demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in balance as measured by the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and Tinetti Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment (POMA) following 7 weeks of hippotherapy intervention. The comparison group consisting of 6 adults showed no improvement in balance. A between group difference in the BBS scores by 14 weeks was noted, thus suggesting that improvements in the intervention group may have been caused by the hippotherapy treatments. None of the subjects in either the intervention or comparison groups participated in other forms of rehabilitation during the study.

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2018

January 2, 2018
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April 3, 2018
April 17, 2018
May 1, 2018
May 15, 2018
June 5, 2018
June 19, 2018
July 3, 2018
July 17, 2018
August 7, 2018
August 21, 2018
September 4, 2018
September 18, 2018
October 2, 2018
October 16, 2018
November 6, 2018
November 20, 2018
December 4, 2018
December 18, 2018

2019

January 1, 2019
January 15, 2019 
February 5, 2019
February 19, 2019
March 5, 2019
March 19, 2019
April 2, 2019
April 16, 2019
May 7, 2019
May 21, 2019

 

2017

January 3, 2017
January 17, 2017
February 7, 2017
February 21, 2017
March 7, 2017
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April 4, 2017
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June 6, 2017
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July 4, 2017
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August 1, 2017
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September 5, 2017
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October 3, 2017
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November 21, 2017
December 5, 2017
December 19, 2017

2016

January 5, 2016
January 19, 2016
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February 16, 2016
March 1, 2016
March 15, 2016
April 5, 2016
April 19, 2016
May 3, 2016
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June 7, 2016
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November 1, 2016
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2015

January 6, 2015
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August 4, 2015
August 18, 2015
September 1, 2015
September 15, 2015
October 6, 2015
October 20, 2015
November 3, 2015
November 17, 2015
December 1, 2015
December 15, 2015

 

2014

January 7, 2014
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February 18, 2014
March 4, 2014
March 18, 2014
April 1, 2014
April 15, 2014
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May 20, 2014
June 3, 2014
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July 1, 2014
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August 5, 2014
August 19, 2014
September 2, 2014
September 16, 2014
October 7, 2014
October 21, 2014
November 4, 2014
November 18, 2014
December 2, 2014
December 16, 2014

2013

January 1, 2013
January 15, 2013
February 5, 2013
February 19, 2013
March 5, 2013
March 19, 2013
April 2, 2013
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June 4, 2013
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October 1, 2013
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November 5, 2013
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December 3, 2013
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2012

January 3, 2012
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2011

January 4, 2011
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2010

January 5, 2010
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February 16, 2010
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June 1, 2010
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July 6, 2010
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September 21, 2010
October 5, 2010
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November 2, 2010
November 16, 2010
December 7, 2010
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2009

January 6, 2009
January 20, 2009
February 3, 2009
February 17, 2009
March 3, 2009
March 17, 2009
April 7, 2009
April 21, 2009
May 5, 2009
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June 2, 2009
June 16, 2009
July 7, 2009
July 21, 2009
August 4, 2009
August 18, 2009
September 1, 2009
September 15, 2009
October 6, 2009
October 20, 2009
November 3, 2009
November 17, 2009
December 1, 2009
December 15, 2009

2008

January 2008
Feburary 2008
March 2008
April 2008
May 2008
June 4, 2008
June 17, 2008
July 1, 2008
July 15, 2008
August 5, 2008
August 19, 2008
September 2, 2008
September 16, 2008
October 7, 2008
October 21, 2008
November 4, 2008
November 19, 2008
December 2, 2008
December 16, 2008

 

 

Participants in a PATH Intl. program are presented information about riding and driving skills and horsemanship in a variety of methods. People with learning disabilities have the chance to learn through visual, auditory, and kinesthetic methods while learning to ride or drive a horse. They may be motivated to learn more about horses than they are in their school classroom. The horse’s response to the aids given by the rider or driver is natural positive reinforcement and helps participants build skills.

Many people with emotional disabilities are able to enjoy equine-based programs that promote physical activity and social interaction. PATH Intl. programs are designed for safety and close supervision as well as fun, interesting activities.

horse-mom-smileChildren and adults with Down syndrome may participate in equine-assisted activities or equine-assisted therapy if atlantioaxial instability (AAI) has been ruled out with current x-rays and/or the participant has no signs or symptoms of this condition per their physician.

Champagne and Dugas (2010) provided 11 weeks of hippotherapy to two children with Down syndrome and measured changes in postural control. The Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) and accelerometry were the instruments used to measure. Improvements in gross motor behavior (particularly walking, running, and jumping) were revealed by the GMFM. The overall accelerometry data demonstrated interesting adaptive responses to the postural challenges induced by the horse.

horse-womenPeople who are deaf or hard of hearing may experience improved self-esteem and a sense of independence and empowerment by becoming an independent equestrian. People with hearing impairments will develop unique ways to communicate with their instructor and equine partner while learning riding or driving.

horse-carriagePeople who have experienced a cerebrovascular accident (CVA) or stroke may experience challenges from deficits resulting from the area of the brain affected by the stroke. Examples of deficits include loss of the use of a limb such as an arm/hand, difficulty finding or understanding words, or balance problems. PATH Intl. centers offer a variety of programs to work with these challenges and those who have had a CVA may benefit from an enjoyable physical activity involving horses. They can learn to ride or drive with one hand or may use an adapted rein on their weaker side. Riding in a group is a great shared social experience as well as opportunity to interact with horses.

wheelchair-leading-horsePeople of all ages with cerebral palsy may enjoy interacting with horses. Children can learn a sport such as riding to share with their peers. Adults may treasure riding as a life long leisure activity. Horseback riding requires skills including good posture, coordination, and balance to direct the horse. Riders with cerebral palsy may progress from riding with sidewalkers to riding independently. Some people with cerebral palsy may prefer to learn carriage driving and may even be able to drive from their own wheelchair in a specially designed carriage.

A large amount of research in equine assisted therapy has involved children with cerebral palsy. Shurtleff, Standeven, & Engsberg (2009) measured head and trunk stability changes in children with cerebral palsy after 12 weeks of hippotherapy treatments provided by an occupational or physical therapist. The research team used a motorized barrel and video motion capture to challenge and measure the changes in motor control. The children showed very significant improvements in control of their trunks and heads at the end of the intervention period and maintained improvements after a 12 week period without treatment.

Rodriguez-Horses-for-heroes-equestrianPeople with brain injuries can experience multiple symptoms related to their injury. They may participate in a variety of programs depending on their abilities and goals. People with a brain injury who are seeking to pursue a new recreational outlet may benefit from riding or driving programs. Participants develop skills needed to direct their equine partners through obstacles, cones courses or on trail rides.

horse-corralChildren and adults with autism participate in a variety of PATH Intl. center programs including riding, driving, vaulting, hippotherapy, and equine-facilitated psychotherapy (EFP). Both equine-assisted activities such as riding or vaulting and equine-assisted therapy such as hippotherapy or psychotherapy can impact the life of a person with autism.

Bass, Duchowny, and Llabre (2008) studied children with autism participating in a 12-week therapeutic horseback riding program. Two instruments were used to measure social functioning before and after the intervention: the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) and the Sensory Profile (SP). They found the children with autism who participated in the therapeutic horseback riding program improved in sensory integration and directed attention as compared to the control group.

Macauley (2007) studied children with mild, moderate and severe autism participating in a 10 week speech therapy session using hippotherapy. The children were evaluated using the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS) as well as attention to task and number or session goals met. All children showed progress on at least one of the following four CARS subtests: relating to people, listening behaviors, verbal communication and nonverbal communication

horse-kneelingChildren with attention deficit disorder (ADD) or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have difficulties with attention and self control of behavior. Horseback riding requires attention to the instructor and the horse. Children who participate in a riding program will be taught sequential steps for learning to control their horse and becoming more independent. Riding lessons can be modified in length to accommodate for decreased attention span in the beginning of the program. Children with ADD or ADHD may also benefit from participation in a vaulting program at a PATH Intl. center. Vaulting requires attention and timing for approaching the horse on the lunge line as well as mounting and dismounting. In vaulting, children work in groups requiring self control and team work.

horse-girl-reinsPeople who have experienced an amputation can be successful riders and drivers. Many para-equestrians have successfully competed with an amputation. Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.) centers are experienced in creating adaptations in equipment to accommodate for people with amputations of upper and lower extremities. Drivers can learn one-handed driving and compete in pleasure driving competitions.

Borges de Araujo, Araújo, Santana, Lopes & Franck (2006) studied the use of hippotherapy as a physical therapy strategy to improve postural steadiness in patients with lower limb amputations. Data were gathered using a platform sensor F-Mat connected to a computer before the first physical therapy session utilizing hippotherapy and after the 20th session. Results from the three participants indicated increased speed and distance post treatment.

PATH-Intl-higher-ed-logo-smGeneral Information

1. Why is the higher education membership offered? What is its purpose?
• To encourage the acceptance of equine-assisted activities and therapies as a legitimate career choice.
• To encourage future students majoring in traditional programs, such as social work, psychology, education and physical therapy, to add another dimension to their current course work. By providing this training within a degree program, graduates will be prepared to introduce and incorporate this work within their future employment.
• Being part of a university degree program adds credibility to equine-assisted activities and therapies;
• The membership increases awareness of how equine-assisted activities and therapies interfaces with education, social work, psychology, physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, recreational therapy, business, non-profit management, and many others.
• Improves the preparedness of instructors to better serve their clientele.
• Through careful coursework selection combined with therapeutic riding instruction, students can determine alternate career paths within the equine-assisted activities and therapies industry. Other careers include business management, accounting, non-profit management, marketing, and public relations.

2. What are the benefits to the higher education institution?
• Adding another dimension of learning and professional development opportunities to existing, established degrees.
• National recognition by a professional organization.
• New practicum opportunities for degree programs that require this component.
• Establishing a relationship with an organization providing services to the local community.
• Increasing the visibility of the higher education institution within the community.
• The creation of service learning opportunities for current students.

3. What are the benefits to the PATH International center?
• The partnership with a higher education institution provides a higher level of credibility to the center.
• The PATH International center will benefit from the diverse backgrounds of the students.
• Higher education institutions have high profiles within their community. This partnership will increase the visibility of the program.
• Opportunities for networking and support from faculty, staff, students, alumni, and donors from the higher education institution may be increased.
• Opportunity to increase volunteer numbers.

Higher Education Membership

1. What are the benefits and requirements of PATH International Higher Education Membership?
Click here for more information.

2. When is my higher education membership due to renew?
Higher education membership is renewed annually.

3. Who initiates the partnership between the PATH International center and the higher education institution?
The initial contact can come from either the PATH International Member Center or the higher education institution.

4. Can PATH International assist us in starting a program?
PATH International staff is available to assist in finding a mentor.

5. What is an “MOU”? Is this required?
• This is the memorandum of understanding (MOU) between the PATH International center and the higher education institution.
• The MOU explains and defines what is expected of both parties.
• The MOU is highly recommended at outset to define (a) who is responsible for which areas of performance, and (b) is mutually protective to both parties to minimize potential for misunderstandings.

Curriculum and Instructors

1. Does our curriculum have to be submitted to PATH International for approval?
Submission of the curriculum is not required for approval.

2. Will PATH International dictate how and what we teach?
Higher education institutions and PATH International Member Centers will provide the necessary information and experiences for students to successfully complete certification.

3. Who determines the eligibility of the instructors?
• Higher education faculty and PATH International Member Center instructor approval will be the responsibility of the university.
• Only certain Higher Education Members/PATH International Premier Accredited Centers will offer the instructor certification. PATH International requires a certified instructor be part of the center in order to be a premier accredited center.

4. Does PATH International provide the curriculum?
• PATH International will provide for the faculty one copy of the Instructor Education Guide, the Registered Level Instructor Workshop Manual and PowerPoint presentations.
• Students may purchase at a discount the Instructor Education Guide, PATH Intl. Standards for Certification and Accreditation and Registered Level Instructor Workshop Manual.

5. Do we have to notify PATH International when we make changes to the curriculum?
• It is not necessary to notify PATH International of curriculum changes.
• Changes to curriculum should contribute to the learning opportunities and experiences needed by the student for successful completion of the PATH International Instructor Certification.

Higher Education Student Members

1. What membership benefits are included in the higher education student membership?
The higher education student membership includes all individual membership benefits including a subscription to PATH International Strides magazine and discounts on PATH International regional and national conferences.

2. What are the dues for a higher education student membership?
The higher education student membership is $45. The student is a student member as long as they remain at that higher education institution or until they become a PATH International Certified Instructor.

3. Will they be required to follow the same steps for certification as those who are taking the traditional route of workshop and certification?
Yes, students will be required to follow the same process, but may not have to attend and complete a workshop depending on the education offered at the college/university.

4. If we offer curricula for certification, what are the employment opportunities for students wishing to become PATH International Certified Instructors?
Instructors are positioned for multiple job opportunities within the equine-assisted activities and therapies industry, new centers looking to start a PATH International center need to have at least one TRI within a year to operate.

5. Can students get a refund it they drop the course?
Refunds will be given if a student drops the course and applies for a refund in writing to the PATH International office within two weeks of the student starting the program.

Certification

1. Who determines when a student is ready for certification?
• The higher education institution and faculty will determine when a student is eligible and prepared for PATH International certification.
• Some higher education institutions may consider the successful completion of certain courses, degrees, and/or certificates to be the determining factor in certification readiness.

2. Can other people participate in the certification?
Yes, other people who have completed the PATH International certification requirements and pay the certification fee may enroll in any remaining spots at a higher education certification. Preference will be given to higher education student members.

3. What happens when a student fails any or all of the instructor certification?
The student will follow the current process for appeals and re-application.

4. Can I become an advanced instructor right away?
If available, a few openings may be offered at certifications to those who qualify.

5. Do I need to become a registered level instructor before becoming an advanced instructor?
Students with the appropriate experience who satisfy the PATH International Advanced Instructor requirements can become an advanced instructor without becoming a registered level instructor first.

6. Can I pick the evaluators for the certification?
Depending on what option for certificatin is selected, either the PATH International office or faculty will select the evaluators. Faculty will select the evaluators from an approved list.

7. Does the partnering center have to be a PATH International Premier Accredited Center to hold a certification?
The partnering center has one year from the time the higher education institution joins as a member to obtain PAC status.

PATH International Partnering Centers

Is being a PATH Intl. Higher Education Member the same as being a PATH International Premier Accredited Center or do we have to go through that process?
All centers will have to go through the steps necessary to become a PATH International Premier Accredited Center.

What is the accreditation application fee for a higher education member?
The accreditation application fee is waived as part of the higher education membership benefit package.

PATH-Intl-higher-ed-logo-smWhat to Know About the PATH Intl. Higher Education Membership

PATH Intl. has an exciting membership for educational institutions that offer education in equine-assisted activities and therapies.

PATH Intl. was founded in 1969 as the North American Riding for the Handicapped Association to promote safe and effective therapeutic horseback riding throughout the United States and Canada. Today, PATH Intl. has over 850 member centers and over 7,300 individual members in countries all over the world who help and support more than 58,000 children and adults with special needs each year through a variety of equine-assisted activity and therapy (EAAT) programs.

The PATH Intl. Higher Education membership offers a flexible membership to meet the needs of a variety of universities and colleges. Depending on your institution’s student needs and profile there are a variety of ways to take advantage of this excellent opportunity. By joining PATH Intl., your students have access to not only exceptional educational resources but also a solid base for networking and success in the equine-assisted activities and therapies (EAAT) industry. In addition, your institution has access to the resources needed to offer PATH Intl. Therapeutic Riding Instructor Certification at the registered and advanced level.

PATH Intl. is constantly seeking to expand and improve its programs and membership which it has done with astonishing success over the past 40 years. Still, PATH Intl. continues to seek new ways to practice and promote EAAT.

As a participating university or college you have the benefits of national recognition and a story for student recruitment, national networking and advertising opportunities and most importantly the opportunity to increase your graduate’s employment opportunities.

Ways Colleges and Universities Can Incorporate Equine-Assisted Activities and Therapies Into Their Programs

  • Equine-assisted activities and therapies introductory courses
  • Courses that meet the education requirements for the PATH Intl. Therapeutic Riding Instructor Certification
  • PATH Intl. Therapeutic Riding Instructor Certification as part of the program
  • Equine-Assisted Learning
  • Equine-Facilitated Psychotherapy
  • Hippotherapy
  • Research in the equine-assisted activities and therapies field
  • Hands-on practicums with equines

Offering Hands-on EAAT Experience

Many institutions have an equine facility as part of their campus and in many cases it is utilized as part of the equine science or equine studies program.  Incorporating EAAT programs or research at the equine facility allows students to gain valuable hands-on experience.

If the institution does not have an on-campus equine facility, students can obtain hands-on experience if the institution partners with a PATH Intl. Member Center.  PATH Intl. Member Centers offer a variety of EAAT programs and professionals working in the EAAT industry.

For more information about the PATH Intl. Higher Education Membership please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call her at (800) 369-7433 ext. 103.

Center Requirements for Working With Higher Education Students

Whether the institution has an on-campus equine facility or partners with a PATH Intl. Member Center the facility must meet all of the center requirements when students are participating in hands-on EAAT at that location.  A center program must be able to provide a safe facility, therapeutic riding instructors, equines, equipment, volunteers and participants.

A full list of the center requirements can be found in the PATH Intl. Higher Education Application packet.  

A list of equipment needed to conduct a therapeutic riding session can be found in the PATH Intl. Higher Education Resources packet.

A Memorandum of Understanding

It is recommended that institutions working with a PATH Intl. Member Center complete a Memorandum of Understanding.
A Memorandum of Understanding is an agreement between the PATH Intl. Member Center and the university. This agreement represents the interest in and support of therapeutic riding at the highest level.  This agreement designates the responsibilities of both parties and an understanding that by working together each party will provide a high level of educational experiences for the institution’s students.  An example can be found in the PATH Intl. Higher Education Resources packet.

Education

Equine-assisted activities and therapies education offered will vary on the institution’s curriculum and degree programs.  Some institutions will offer one course in EAAT while others may offer an undergraduate degree in therapeutic riding.  Suggested departments and courses where EAAT education may be offered and suggest reference materials for EAAT can be found in the PATH Intl. Higher Education Resources packet.

Certification

Institutions are able to incorporate PATH Intl. Certified Therapeutic Riding Instructor certification as part of their curriculum or degree program.  There are two levels of therapeutic riding instructor certification available to higher education members and their students, registered and advanced.  PATH Intl. offers other certifications but these are not available to institutions at this time.  

Registered level:  The register level instructor prepares students to become safe, knowledgeable, and effective therapeutic riding instructors.  A PATH Intl. registered instructor must be competent in basic levels of equine management, horsemanship, riding instruction, teaching methodologies and disabilities. Click here for the PATH Intl. Higher Education Registered Level Certification Criteria packet.

Advanced level:  A PATH Intl. Advanced Level Certified Instructor is knowledgeable in horsemanship and understands disabilities and the relationship to therapeutic riding. This instructor is able to conduct safe, challenging and therapeutically effective lessons to individuals with disabilities. He/she is able to demonstrate instruction that shows progression in riding skills in safe, challenging lessons.  Click here for the PATH Intl. Higher Education Advanced Level Certification Criteria packet.


Types of courses or suggestions for courses that meet PATH Intl. certification needs:  

  • Equine Courses
  • Equine Science
  • Safety and Handling/Understanding the horse
  • Equine Psychology/Behavior/Communication
  • Training/Natural Horsemanship/Theories of Training 
  • Equine & Stable Management (history, breeds, care, diseases, tack, etc.)
  • Facility Design and Development
  • Equitation (several skill levels)
  • Historical Perspectives of the Horse-Human Relationship
  • Animal Behavior 

 


More information about PATH Intl. certification at the registered and advanced levels can be found on the certification page.

 

CONTINUING EDUCATION GUIDELINES

✔  Continuing education activities should involve active participation, reflect pursuit of professional development and encourage self-reflection, ultimately enhancing your instruction skills and expanding knowledge related to the EAAT industry.

✔  Continuing education hours translate directly from clock hours

✔  Continuing Education opportunities are not limited to events sponsored by the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.).

✔  PATH Intl. Certified Professionals must submit compliance and dues annually

PATH Intl Certified Professionals must submit the following items to be considered renewed and compliant:

✔  Payment of Annual Membership Dues

✔  Submission of 20 continuing education hours obtained during the previous 12 months.

PATH Intl Certified Professional Continuing Education Requirements

1-year Renewal Cycle:  20 Hours of Continuing Education to include hours of Disability Education and Certification Core Requirements (6 CEUs in Disability Education, 2 CEUs for each Certification Core Requirement).

All PATH Intl Certified Professionals must maintain current First Aid and CPR.  Documentation of current Adult & Child CPR and First Aid certifications no longer need to be submitted for annual compliance, but may be requested at the discretion of PATH Intl.

Documentation of all compliance requirements may be requested upon the discretion of PATH Intl at any time.

Types of Continuing Education:

General Continuing Education (CE):

General Continuing Education Hours (CE) are defined as any allowable continuing education hours that do not fall under Disability Education (defined below) or Certification Core Requirements (defined below). These hours should reflect the overall purpose of all continuing education and the pursuit of professional development. These hours should encourage self-reflection, enhance instructor skills and techniques, and expand knowledge of EAAT, Equine Management and Welfare.

Please see the Continuing Education Table below for requirements for CE.

Disability Education (DE):

Disability education (DE) is defined as educational activities that provide the student with greater understanding of the physical, social, cognitive and/or behavioral impacts experienced by individuals with disabilities, mental health disorders or emotional trauma. 

The education received should help the instructor understand how to communicate with and more effectively instruct a wide range of EAAT participants in order to increase the efficacy of the learning environment.

Please see the Continuing Education Table below for minimum requirements for DE.

Certification Core Requirements (CR)*

Certification Core Requirements (CR) is defined as the specific type of continuing education hours that one must obtain to stay compliant with each certification held.

The Certification Core Requirements are:

  • Certified Instructors (Registered/Advanced/Masters): Mounted Riding Lessons received
  • Equine Specialist in Mental Health and Learning: Groundwork Lessons received, or Equine Behavior Education
  • Vaulting Instructors:  Vaulting Lessons received
  • Driving Instructors: Driving Lessons received

*Please see the section “More on Certification Core Requirements” for exceptions and limitations to these hours

Please see the Continuing Education Table below for minimum requirements for CR.

 

Continuing Education Table

TYPE DESCRIPTION LIMIT CEU Conversion
DE Disability Education Minimum 6 hours (no maximum) 60 min = 1 DE
CR Certification Core Requirement Minimum of 2 Hours per certification 60 min = 1 CR
CE General Continuing Education No minimum or maximum requirement 60 min = 1 CE

More on Certification Core Requirements

Exceptions:

PATH Intl. understands that not all of our instructors may be able to attend personal lessons to maintain their certifications for any reason.  If, for any reason, an instructor is not able to complete personal lessons they may count the following in place of lessons for their Certification Core Requirement/s:

  • Coaching, or receiving coaching, from another PATH Intl Certified Professional.
    • Coaching is defined as observing a therapeutic lesson and providing the PATH Intl Certified Professional with positive and constructive feedback on their lesson and/or riding skills.
  • Attending a formal education event with an emphasis on instruction/teaching techniques
  • Mentoring an Instructor in Training. (Mentoring is allowable only if the instructor has taken the PATH Intl Mentor Training Course.  If an instructor has not taken this course, mentor hours will not count for CEUs)

Limitations:

To increase the professionalism and to promote a more experienced Certified Professional, PATH Intl has placed limitations on the maximum allowable CEU hours for the following Certification Core Requirements:

  • Coaching:  a maximum of 4 hours is allowable for Coaching or receiving Coaching. 
  • Mentoring:  Mentoring an Instructor in Training is allowable for a max of 4 hours. (Allowable only once an instructor has taken the PATH Intl Mentor Training Course.  Certified Professionals who have not taken the Mentor Training course may not count these hours as CEUs. See the section “Mentor Training” for more information.)
  • Lessons:  A maximum of 4 hours is allowable for all Certified Professionals.  (exception:  when using lessons to count for Certification Core requirements, all Certified Professionals may have a maximum of 6 hours for ALL lessons)

Allowable Hours for Disability Education (DE):

Disability Education may be obtained through the following ways only:

  • Disability related conferences/meetings (e.g., ADD, ADHD, autism, Down Syndrome, learning disabilities, sensory processing, etc.)
  • Special Education conferences/meetings
  • Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy or Speech Language Pathology conferences/meetings
  • Veteran related education (emotional trauma, phantom limb syndrome, PTSD, traumatic brain injury, etc.)
  • Conferences/meetings on general mental health-related issues for adults and children
  • Professional Research Projects conducted through a College/University or Research Center
  • Online learning through online courses, webinars or videos from Higher Education Institutions, Professional Associations, or other reputable learning sources.

Allowable Hours for General Continuing Education (CE):

General Continuing Education may be obtained in any of the following ways, including ways listed above:

  • Formally organized educational events
  • Equine welfare, management, behavior or skill clinics
  • Attending/auditing PATH Intl. workshops
  • PATH Intl. Horse Expo
  • Sessions from Horse Expos and Fairs (Sessions must be listed individually to receive credit. General Horse Expo attendance is not allowable as CEUs)
  • Higher Education courses that provide a greater understanding of persons with disabilities (socially, cognitively, behaviorally) and human behavior
  • College-level anatomy, physiology and biomechanics courses
  • Writing and submitting papers, articles or materials for publication (includes PATH Intl. materials)
  • Presenting on topics or research related to EAAT at professional conferences, symposiums, clinics and panel discussions
  • Instructing PATH Intl. workshops (NOTE for Evaluators: each workshop may be applied to both instructor and evaluator compliance)
  • Retaking PATH Intl. Online Courses/Exams
  • Professional conferences
  • Attending conferences, symposiums and panel presentations with the objective of gaining knowledge pertaining to the EAAT industry
  • Participating in hands-on exercises to strengthen areas of focus pertaining to the EAAT industry to increase professional competence.
  • Coaching or Receiving Coaching (Coach must be a compliant PATH Intl. Certified Instructor preferably with 5+ years involvement in the EAAT industry.)
    • Student must be a compliant PATH Intl. Certified Instructor with fewer years of experience than the coach
    • Includes instructor candidate mentoring ONLY for mentors who have completed the PATH Intl. Mentor Training course.
      • For more information on Mentor Training Courses please see the “Mentor Training” section
  • Educational webinars and videos
  •  PATH Intl. Conference Session Videos
  • PATH Intl. Educational Webinars and Online Courses
  • Webinars offered by professional equine and/or disability-related associations
  • Academic or Outcomes-based EAAT research
  • Receiving lessons (max of 4 hours)
  • Volunteering for PATH Intl. (max of 2 hours)
  • Horseshow judging for a PATH Intl. Member Center, the Special Olympics or Paralympics (max of 2 hours)
  • Attending or presenting a PATH Intl. Member Center volunteer training

Activities Not Allowable as CEU Hours:

The following hours will never be allowable as any type of CEU:

  • Participating in exercise classes or personal training
  • Horseshow judging, competing or volunteering at events not hosted by a PATH Intl. Member Center, the Special Olympics or Paralympics
  • Recreational riding (e.g., trail riding, cattle sorting, cattle drives, steeplechase, fox hunting, etc.)
  • General Horse Expo or Fair attendance (NOTE: attendance at specific activities that fall into the accepted CEU categories listed above WILL be accepted, please list the individual activities attended to receive credit)
  • Providing human or equine massage, Reiki or acupuncture or acupressure as a service
  • Community service related volunteering (Court Ordered or any other hours required by school etc.)
  • CPR, First Aid, EMT, Paramedic and/or First Responder training
  • Administering veterinary care
  • Observing farrier or veterinary services
  • Observing or providing therapeutic sessions or riding lessons (EXCEPT when providing mentoring or coaching)
  • Day-to-day job duties
  • Reading of any materials

CEU Overlap:

A CEU may be counted as disability education (DE), General Continuing Education (CE) or Certification Core Requirements (CR), but may not be counted twice.  Counting hours twice does not provide new knowledge or expand the PATH Intl Certified Professional’s experience level in any way.

Mentor Training

The Mentor Training Workshop was created in response to the need for a more formalized education process to enhance the skills of those mentoring. The objective is to increase the number of qualified mentors available to instructors in training. Another added benefit is to provide current PATH Intl. Certified Instructors with a continuing education opportunity while enhancing personal observation, evaluation and feedback skills. See the mentor training page for information on this continuing education opportunity. Visit the PATH Intl. Events Calendar for workshop dates.

To review continuing education hours you have earned at PATH Intl. Regional and National Conferences, visit the My Professional Development page (you must be logged in).

2008-18PATH Intl. Educational Philosophy

PATH Intl. utilizes an educational model that includes a commitment to adult-focused pedagogy (sometimes known as andragogy), a centrally developed curriculum that is undergirded by mission and guided by outcomes assessment and accelerated (theory and practice) learning tailored to adults.

Continuing Education (CEUs)

Continuing education hours are referred to as clock hours. Continuing education activities can be any educational event that you attend, which will benefit you in your work as a therapeutic riding instructor, and are not limited to those sponsored by Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.). Click here for more information. Click here for external resources.

Higher Education

The Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.) Higher Education Membership positions colleges and universities that incorporate PATH Intl. instructor training certification within their curricula as some of the best resources for the student population. Click here for more information.

Online Education

PATH Intl. offers online courses to our members that cover issues related to PATH Intl. Instructor Certification and PATH Intl. Centers, as well as conference recordings and webinars for instructor CEUs. 

Approved Training Courses (ATCs)

One of the most effective and comprehensive ways to prepare for PATH Intl. instructor certification is to attend a course at a PATH Intl. center offering an Approved Training Course (ATC). These carefully screened training sites have developed an intensive education curriculum that educates participants and offer classroom learning and hands-on experience with horses and riders. Offered for both the Registered and Advanced Certification, the courses are particularly effective and user friendly in that they culminate with an opportunity to complete the PATH Intl. certification as part of the program. Click here for more information.

Faculty

Click here for PATH Intl. Faculty

 

PATH-Intl-higher-ed-logoThe Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.) Higher Education Membership positions colleges and universities that incorporate PATH Intl. instructor training certification within their curricula as some of the best resources for the student population.

Membership is available designed to address the current needs, abilities and desire of the higher education member to offer coursework suitable for PATH Intl. instructor training and certification.  For more information aboutt he PATH Intl. Higher Education Membership, go to the Higher Ed Membership Details page.

As the industry looks to the future, these professionals who are academically trained in equine-assisted activities and therapies (EAAT) have the potential to be outstanding leaders in innovation, better practices and cutting-edge research within all of the EAAT disciplines. To meet the growing demand for such curricula from students, PATH Intl. is proud to support colleges and universities in making this career path available to interested college and university students.

Have questions? Visit the following pages:

Click here to download the Application for Higher Education Membership booklet

Current PATH Intl. Higher Education Members Offering EAAT Education

Colleges/universities that offer PATH Intl. certification as part of the degree program.

    Texas-Tech-logo     Texas-Tech-TRC-logo

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Texas Tech Therapeutic Riding Center  
Texas Tech University
PO Box 42141
Lubbock, TX  79409
(806) 792-4683
www.afs.ttu.edu/ttrc

UNH_logo_sm

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Equine Center
278 Mast Rd Ext
Durham, NH 03824
(603) 862-0131
https://colsa.unh.edu/agriculture-nutrition-food-systems/program/bs/equine-studies-major-therapeutic-riding-option

The UNH Equine Program combines award-winning equestrian teams with strong academics and outstanding opportunities for hands-on learning, including on-site PATH International Premier Accredited Operating Center which give students real-world experience in the equine industry. The program includes:
• Three courses of study in the B.S. Program: Equine Industry Management, Therapeutic Riding and Equine Science.
• A.A.S. in Equine Management
• Hands-on classes in horse care, stable management, equine sports medicine, conformation & lameness, horse trials management, training, riding instruction, equine assisted activities and therapies, and reproductive management.
• PATH Intl. Registered level instructor certification done on site within curriculum.
• Riding program in dressage and eventing
• Two successful equestrian teams: the 2009 National Champion IDA Team and 2011, 2012 & 2013  Regional Champion IHSA Team.
• PATH Intl. Premier Accredited Therapeutic Riding Program located on campus.
• USEA/USEF recognized Horse Trials and USDF/USEF Recognized Dressage Shows
• 52-stall facility, including student boarding, with indoor & outdoor arenas and Beginner Novice through Preliminary cross-country course ON CAMPUS.

Ohio-University-logo

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Ohio Horse Park
400 Bobcat Lane
Franklin Furnace, OH 45629
(740) 354-9907

Ohio University Southern
Associates of Applied Science in Equine Studies  

The Associate in Applied Science degree in Equine Studies is designed to prepare students to seek enjoyment and employment as trained professionals in the equine industry. Our objective is to provide each student the opportunity to develop skills and expertise in the areas of riding instruction, therapeutic riding, farm management and business, pre-animal science, and pre-veterinary technology.

The Equine Studies degree will provide education and training to prepare students to enter the vast equine industry. The program offers core courses to assist students in forming a solid foundation in the basics of equine studies. Students may select from specialized tracks or concentrations to specifically tailor the program to their needs and interests. Courses combine lectures and laboratory work. Lectures are to inform the students of related equine information and skills with labs providing opportunities to apply the knowledge.

The program is located at the Ohio Horse Park, a 180-acre University owned facility. The Ohio Horse Park includes two indoor arenas, two outdoor arenas, and boarding for student horses. A student managed veterinary clinic is also part of the Ohio Horse Park. The Ohio University Center for Therapeutic Horsemanship is a nationally accredited center serving the needs of the local community. Students actively instruct participants, evaluate and train horses and work administratively to assist in managing the center.

  ndsu_sig

North Dakota State University

Bison Strides Equine Assisted Activities and Therapies

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Hultz Hall 174
Dept 7630, PO Box 6050
Fargo, ND 58108-6050
phone: (701) 231-9611
fax: (701) 231-7590

UWRF-logo

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University of Wisconsin River Falls
410 S. 3rd Street
River Falls, WI 54022

 

 

Colleges/universities that provide curriculum to meet the criteria of PATH Intl. certification. The certification itself is completed outside of the degree program at a PATH Intl. Center.

suny-cobleskill

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SUNY Cobleskill
106 Suffolk Cir
Cobleskill, NY 12043
(518) 255-5011

College students will be immersed in an integrated therapeutic horsemanship program. The program is designed to provide the college student in-depth study in the foundations of equine-assisted activities and therapies, including subjects within equine science, special education, psychology, recreation and sport, and sociology. Successful students may complete on campus the required teaching hours necessary for application to the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship Int. Instructor Certification. The program offers the range and depth of course work to enter directly into the field of therapeutic horsemanship or to pursue graduate studies.

           lake erie college small

Lake Erie College
391 W. Washington St.
Painesville OH 44077
Contact: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  (440) 375-8005

As one of the oldest institutions for higher learning in the Western Reserve, Lake Erie College is proud of its long heritage. From its start as a female seminary to a coeducational institution of today offering undergraduate and graduate degrees to individuals of all ages, the College has been a leader in higher education for 160 years.

Lake Erie College currently offers 33 undergraduate majors, 26 undergraduate minors, as well as programs of concentration and licensure in addition to graduate programs leading to a master's degree in business administration, education and physician assistant studies.

Home to one of the oldest equestrian programs in the country and proudly boasting the 2011 National IDA Championship Team, The School of Equine Studies at Lake Erie College is a flagship program. Equine studies provides opportunity to develop skills necessary for equine facility management, teacher/trainer careers and therapeutic horsemanship. Programs in the School of Equine Studies also provide a multi-disciplinary approach to the equine industry in an effort to maximize successful business ventures.

The therapeutic horsemanship major allows students to focus on therapeutic horsemanship instruction or program administration with special attention to best practices in delivering therapeutic horsemanship to equestrians with special needs. Students benefit by a practical internship as well as hands on experience with the onsite therapeutic horsemanship classes for community riders.

Waubonsee-Equine-Logo-sm

Waubonsee-Community-College

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Waubonsee Community College
Rt. 47 at Waubonsee Dr.
Sugar Grove, IL 60554
(815) 690-8144  
 

 

Colleges/universities that offer curriculum related to equine-assisted activities and therapies but do not offer PATH Intl. certifications.

judson college logo 

Judson College
302 Bibb Street
Marion, AL 36756
(334) 410-0748
Contact: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Utah-State-University-web

Animal, Dairy and Veterinary Science Department
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4815 Old Main Hill
Logan, Ut  84322-4815
435-797-2162

 

west-virginia-logo 

West Virginia University 
Davis College of Agriculture
PO Box 6108
Morgantown, WV 26506-6108

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The award-winning publication of the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.) is a full-color, quarterly magazine titled PATH Intl. Strides, which features a different theme or topic each issue pertaining to our members and the world of EAAT. The current issue of PATH Intl. Strides is available only to members. Archived issues are linked below. If you do not see an issue or an article that you are looking for, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Archived Issues

Winter 2019

The 50th Anniversary Issue

PATH Intl.--The First 50 Years
Following in Their Hoofprints--Five PATH Intl. Pioneers
The First Center
Inspiring Story: Lessons From Octavia
2018 PATH Intl. Conference
PATH Intl. Winners

Special NARHA News Insert

 

Spring 2019

See this issue now in the Member's Only Section

Summer 2019

Fall 2019

 

Winter 2018

The Global Involvement Issue

2017 PATH Intl. Conference & Annual Meeting
PATH Intl. Award Winners
Healing With Horses - Zimbabwe
Healing the Scars of War
Equi-Formed Therapy in South Africa
Meet Me Halfway (international instructor candidates)

Spring 2018

The Equine-Assisted Learning Issue

Past, Present and Future of Equine-Assisted Learning
Structuring an EAL Program
Herd Selection
Strengthening Families Program
Certification Criteria and Standards for EAL Programs
Using EAL for Volunteer Trainings
Inspiring Story: From Adversity to Aspiration
An Industry Snapshot

Summer 2018

The Volunteer and Community Issue

Opening the Gate to Collaboration
Raising the Bar (Volunteer Management)
The Right Fit (selecting volunteers to serve with veteran populations)
Empowered Connections
From Paper to Paperless
Improve Your Program With a Volunteer Assessment
Mustang Meghan

Fall 2018

Complementary and Integrative Health Issue
Understanding a Horse's Emotional Health
Mindfulness and Yogic Movement
Giving Back to the Horse
Listening Through Touch
Vision Therapy Impacts Riding

Winter 2017

The Executive Director Issue

2016 PATH Intl. Conference & Annual Meeting
Jeffersonian Dinner
PATH Intl. Award Winners
A Center Walks On
2016 PATH Intl. Strategic Plan
The Power of Collaboration and Connection
Capacity Building--Nurturing Relationships to Grow
Keeping Lesson Horses Fit

 Spring 2017

The Equine-Facilitated Psychotherapy Issue

Theoretical Foundations of Equine-Facilitated Psychotherapy
EFP Ethics and Skills for Equine Specialists
Embracing the Horse as Co-facilitator
Treating Survivors of Sexual Trauma
Mindful Support for EFP
EFP With Carriage Ponies

Summer 2017

The Lessons Issue

Sensory Strategies
Promoting Independence
Handling Challenging Behavior
Increasing Speech and Communication
Stepping Stones to Lesson Success
Enhancing Lessons Through Interactive Vaulting

 

Fall 2017

The Equine Wellness Issue

Taking Stress Out of Sessions
Happy Horses and Healthy Herds
Right Relationship
New Horse in the Paddock?
Teaching Soft Hands
Roaming Tracks for Herd Health

Winter 2016

The Certification Issue

2015 PATH Intl. Conference & Annual Meeting
PATH Intl. Award Winners
Rising to the Challenge
Next Generation Training
Certification Demystified

Spring 2016

The Veterans Issue

Service Members, Students and Steeds
Overcoming Military Sexual Trauma
Advanced Workshops for Veterans
Operation Centaur
Inspiring Story: Horses Help Heal the Walking Wounded, reprinted with permission by Tim Hayes

Summer 2016

The Special Programs Issue

Building Community in the ASD Population
Serving Seniors
Steeds and Sobriety
The Dressage Connection
Riding and Rehabilitation
Enrich Your Equines, Enrich Your Program

 

Fall 2016

The Research Issue

Temple Grandin Equine Center
The Rules of Research
Researching EFP
ASD and Therapeutic Riding Study
Pairing Strengths for Success
Writing a Successful Research Grant

Winter 2015

Table of Contents:
2014 PATH Intl. Conference & Annual Meeting
PATH Intl. Award Winners
Secrets of a Small Shop
Case Study: Focusing on the Ideal Donor
Targeting Fundraising Messages
Increasing Volunteer Satisfaction

Spring 2015

The Equine Welfare Issue
Tables of Contents:
The Bond That Heals
Going Bitless
Equine Yoga
Polo Ponies Partner With Centers

Summer 2015

Table of Contents:
Always By Your Side—How to Be Your Volunteers' Best Resource
Turning Conflicts Into Cooperation
Going Barefoot and Booted
The Mentoring Relationship
Setting Guidelines for Equine Euthanasia
Staff Satisfaction Survey

Fall 2015

The Challenges Issue
Table of Contents:
Special Olympics World Games
Cancer Kickers
Insight Into Vision
Camp Challenges
ADHA Research on Exercise

Winter 2014

Table of Contents:
Destination: Success
PATH Intl. Award Winners
Birth of a New Center
Inclusive Instruction
Culture Competency and Global Outreach

Spring 2014

Table of Contents:
Turning Riders' Life Goals Into Reality
Creating a Unified Trail Team
Horses and Recovery
Behind the Behavior
Awareness, Openness and Action

Summer 2014

Table of Contents:
Playing With Horses
Refined Performance Horsemanship
Thinking Outside the Saddle
Playtime
Somatic Horsemanship

Fall 2014

Table of Contents:
PATH Intl. Strides
Wins Top Honors
Surviving Hurricane Sandy
Smart Risk Management
Anatomy of an Outbreak
Fire Prevention

Winter 2013

Table of Contents:
The 2012 PATH Intl. Conference & Annual Meeting
The 2012 PATH Intl. Award Winners
Masterful Mentoring
Teaching Techniques for Children With ASD
EFL Improves Children's Social Competence
Teaching Through Tunes

Spring 2013

Table of Contents:
Where Veterans Find Peace of Mind
A Veteran's Viewpoint
Healing Through Horsemanship
Treating Trauma Through an EFP Program
Veterans Helping Veterans
Inspiring Story: Driving Miss Nancy
A Great Idea: NSBA Offers Competition for Veterans

Summer 2013

Table of Contents:
Best Practices
Diversify & Grow
Special Events Success
Surviving the SLOW Recovery
Inspiring Story: Born to Ride
PATHWays: Earning Premier Accreditation
A Great Idea: Turning Manure Into Money

Fall 2013

Table of Contents:
PATH Intl. Wins Equine Industry Vision Award
Riding Into the Wild
4-H Club 4 All
A Whole Family Philosophy
An Unorthodox Approach

Winter 2012

PATH Intl. Conference & Award Winners
Empowering Volunteers
Volunteers Tell Their Stories
Desensitizing Tips for Horses and Students

Spring 2012

PATH Intl. Community Connections
Rehab Hospital Collaborates With Center
Hospice Teams Up With Horses
Therapeutic Driving Bulds Car Driving Skills

Summer 2012

Temperament Testing for Job Success
Horsemanship Teaches Humanship
A Therapeutic Riding Lesson From the Horse's Point of View
The Role of the Horse in EFP

Fall 2012

Experiential Education
Graduate Goes Global
Center Promotes University Research
The Path to a Higher Education Membership

Winter 2011

The 2010 NARHA National Conference And Annual Meeting
Congratulations to the 2010 NARHA National Winners
EAAT Pioneer in Ecuador
Bringing HOPE to Mainland China
Opening a Center in Oman
The Assessment Process (Part 1)
Europe’s First NARHA Center

Spring 2011

Autism and Therapeutic Riding: A Pilot Study
Hands-on Horses
Is Research Right for Your Center?
Measuring Outcomes
The Assessment Process (Part 2)
EAAT Training For Injured Brains

Summer 2011

A New Name for Our Association
Creating an All Abilities Camp
Confidence Coaching
Researching the EFP Process
Memory Centers
Riding Outside the Box

Fall 2011

Center Fundraising
Healing With Horses
Creating an Effective Board
Enduring Center Survival
Brain/Body Training for Riding

Winter 2010

The 2009 NARHA National Conference And Annual Meeting
Congratulations to the 2009 NARHA National Winners
Creating an Effective Risk Management Plan
Set-Up for Safety
2009 FRDI Congress

 Spring 2010

A Good match-Finding The Right Grant Master
Marketing Solutions-Staying Up When the Economy is Down
The Horse-Human Heart Connection
Special Events-Fundraising in Very Challenging Times
Maximizing Your Center’s Online Presence

Summer 2010

Our Equine Partners: Facilitators, Assistants or Both?
Equine 401K Plan
Equine Stress Management
When In Doubt, Stop
Training Your Interactive Vaulting Partner

Fall 2010

Dances With Horses
Silver Saddles
Working With non-verbal Learners
Showmanship at Halter
Healing Feelings

Winter 2009

The 2008 NARHA National Conference
NARHA Congratulates Award Winners
NARHA Mentor Training Workshops
Three Keys to Creating a Successful Volunteer Program

Spring 2009

World  Class Competitors
Riding Rehab-Veterans with Limb Loss
Stable Safety: Risk Management for Equine Interactions in the 21st Century
Helping Hands
Taming the Wild Horse Within

Summer 2009

Taking the Next Step
The Value of Interactive Vaulting
Treating Trauma-EFP Aids Recovery
Arena Set-Up for Success

Fall 2009

United We Lead
Merging Missions
Relationships with Rehab Centers
Heroes On Horses
Joining United Way

Winter 2007/2008

The 2007 NARHA National Conference
Congratulating NARHA Award Winners
The Language of Liability
Great Games
Unmounted Programs Meet Many Needs
New NARHA Vaulting Certification
Creating a Safety Net

Spring 2008

Driving Safety Steps
The Bridge Between Trauma and Trust
Serving the Older Veteran
Riding Motivates Reading

Summer 2008

South Korea-NARHA’s First International Workshop and Certification
Equine Welfare-Finding the Right Balance
Safe Mount and Dismounts
Understanding Equine Language
Tack Matching Myths

Fall 2008

EAAT Centers Go Green
Better Budgeting Breeds Success
Guidelines for Growth
Cultivating Donors





 

 

Mounting Ramp Plans

Click here for pdf, which includes full size drawings.

Disclaimer: Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.) recommends that you obtain a copy of the ADAAG as well as accessibility regulations set by your state before you design, construct or alter your facility.

The necessity for a center to have mounting equipment cannot be over emphasized. Your particular needs will be dictated by your rider population. If you have riders who use aids for mobility and can’t negotiate steps, a mounting ramp is advisable. If these riders are small enough that you can safely do a one- or two-man lift from the ground, you may do without a ramp.

Before you think of reasons not to have a ramp, however, remember a goal all centers have: To increase the independence of riders with disabilities. When a rider is an active participant in the mounting – perhaps independently legging over or doing his own chair-to-saddle transfer – many therapeutic objectives are being met. Construction of the ramp warrants planning. It should be of a height adequate for all the horses that will be mounted from it. A ramp is generally higher than a block. You will not have the rider use the stirrup to mount from the ramp. If you have a gradual rise to the ramp, it may be possible to mount riders from locations along the ramp – this gives you a variety of heights to work from. Some ramps have a lower platform a short way down from the top platform.

The ramp should be constructed so that the instructor or sidewalker can walk down the ramp as the horse departs. There should be no railing beside the horse, and the gradient of the slope should encourage independence from the riders, not too steep that those with crutches or electric wheelchairs can’t maneuver themselves. An off-side barrier is desirable to encourage the horse to enter and remain straight. Ideally, another ramp on the offside can be used by riders who may need to mount from the right. Electric wheelchairs tend to have the driving mechanism on the right, making it desirable to transfer from the left side of the chair onto the horse – and offside mount.

If not a second ramp, a mounting block is helpful, as it places the volunteers at a level that allows better leverage to assist the rider’s mount. A wall or fence should never be used as the offside barrier.

The ramp should be located outside the arena and situated so that it provides a straight line from the chute into the arena. A straight line is important for those first strides as the rider is settling in. Ramps located in the arena can hinder full use of the arena. Portable ramps are ideal, but not always possible.

Two ramping arrangements are possible:

  • Place two ramps about 28 inches apart so the horse can be led between them for mounting.
  • Place a block about 18 inches high (preferably with steps on both ends) parallel to one ramp. This block serves as a boundary for the horse and allows the side helpers to assist in the mounting process.

A mounting block should be part of every center that does not have a ramp. Mounting using a block is better for horses, saddles and your backs. It also encourages a rider to be more independent getting into the saddle, and the walk up a properly constructed block is itself therapeutic.

Blocks should be of solid construction, stable and finished against your particular weather conditions. Thickness of surfaces should be at least 7/8 inches and 2 x 4s shold be used for supports. The rise of each step should not exceed eight inches, less if indicated by rider needs. Steps should be side enough for two to walk up and deep enough for the full foot length. A ‘stopper’ that keeps the foot from slipping through under the next step is desirable. The platform needs to be large enough to comfortably accommodate two adults and allow freedom of movement. The height should be suitable to horses and enable riders to leg over with minimum assistance. The rider should never place a foot into a stirrup that is below platform level. Some type of railing away from the horse may be indicated to further rider independence.

As with ramps, the block should be located outside the arena and allow a few straight strides on the depart. Place the block to enable the instructor or sidewalker to walk down the steps as the horse walks out.

Does Your Mounting Ramp Meet ADA Standards?
The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), which became law Jan. 26, 1992, is designed to ensure equal opportunities to individuals with disabilities in the areas of employment, public accommodations, transportation, state and local government services and telecommunications. In doing so, the act addresses accessibility issues for public facilities, including ramps.

The design, construction or alteration of facilities must conform to the Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards (UFAS) or with the Americans with Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidelines for Buildings and Facilities (ADAAG).

The ADAAG standards advise that ramp slopes “between 1:16 and 1:20 are preferred…Most ambulatory people and most people who use wheelchairs can manage a slope of 1:16. Many people cannot manage a slope of 1:12 or 30 feet (9 m).”

However, the formal standards read: “The least possible slope shall be used for any ramp. The maximum slope of a ramp in new construction shall be 1:12. The maximum rise for any run shall be 30 inches (760 mm).”

Landings are required at the bottom and top of each ramp and ramp run. “The landing shall be at least as wide as the ramp run leading to it. The landing length shall be a minimum of 60 inches (1525 mm) clear. If ramps change direction at landings, the minimum landing size shall be 60 inches by 60 inches (1525 mm by 1525 mm).”

A handrail on one side is recommended, with a curb on the other side to prevent the rider’s foot from slipping off. The diameter of the handrail must be 1-1/4 inches to 1-1/2 inches. If it is adjacent to a wall, the space between the wall and the bar must be 1-1/2 in. “Ramps and landings with drop-offs shall have curbs, walls, railings or projecting surfaces that prevent people from slipping off the ramp. Curbs shall be a minimum of 2 inches (50 mm) high.

If space or other limitations prohibit you from meeting the above specifications, the ADAAG standards have an “Equivalent Facilitation” notation, which states: “Departures from particular technical and scoping requirements of this guideline by the use of other designs and technologies are permitted where the alternative designs and technologies used will provide substantially equivalent or greater access to and usability of the facility.”

For more information about ADA or a free copy of the ADAAG (Appendix A to 28 CFR part 36) contact: U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division, Coordination and Review Section, P.O. Box 66118, Washington DC 20035-6118, (202) 514-0301, (202) 514-0381 (TDD).

 

4

Interactive Vaulting is an activity in which the participants perform movements on and around the horse. These movements can be very simple such as sitting without holding onto the surcingle or a more elaborate vaulting position move such as kneeling or standing on the horse. It all depends on the individual needs of the vaulter.

Interactive Vaulting fosters teamwork, teaches respect for the horse, fosters independence, builds confidence, encourages social interaction, offers individualized instruction while mounted, and it introduces all gaits in a short period of time.

Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.) offers an instructor certification in the specialty area of Interactive Vaulting. The program includes a three-day interactive vaulting workshop plus a two-day Interactive Vaulting certification. Learn more.

Tina_smCarriage Driving is a fast growing sport. PATH Intl. centers can offer students with physical, mental, sensory, or emotional disabilities the rewards of interaction and control of a horse or pony while driving from a carriage seat or in their own wheelchair in a carriage modified to accommodate their wheelchair. Carriage driving gives participants a riding alternative, opening up the world of horses to those who may be unable to ride due to weight, balance, fatigue, allergies, asthma, fear of heights, the inability to sit astride, or other issues. It can also provide the student with a unique movement experience. Therapeutic Driving is about imparting knowledge of safety, horses, harnessing, and driving skills to children and adults using teamwork. It takes three to five volunteers to make one driving turn out! Drivers with a disability who are interested in competing are welcome at traditional carriage driving competitions, such as pleasure driving and combined driving events, where they compete on an equal footing with able bodied competitors.

PATH Intl. offers three levels of driving instructor certification. Learn more.

horseshow021_smTherapeutic riding is an equine-assisted activity for the purpose of contributing positively to the cognitive, physical, emotional and social well-being of individuals with special needs. Therapeutic riding provides benefits in the areas of health, education, sport and recreation & leisure. Throughout the world, there are thousands of individuals with special needs who experience the rewarding benefits of horseback riding. A disability does not have to limit a person from riding horses. In fact, experiencing the motion of a horse can be very therapeutic. Because horseback riding rhythmically moves the rider's body in a manner similar to a human gait, riders with physical disabilities often show improvement in flexibility, balance and muscle strength. In addition to the therapeutic benefits, horseback riding also provides recreational opportunities for individuals with disabilities to enjoy the outdoors.

At Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.) centers, professional staff and volunteers work closely with riders to ensure safe riding sessions. A new rider is generality assisted by two sidewalkers who walk alongside the horse, as well as a horse leader. Riding classes are taught by an instructor who has a strong equine background, as well as an understanding of various disabilities.

PATH Intl. offers three levels of certification for therapeutic riding instructors: Registered, Advanced and Master. Learn more.

It's a Matter of Trust

marilynaction1_smBy becoming a Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.) Member Center, you will be joining a community of centers that people trust. More than 850 centers offering equine assisted activities and therapies (EAAT) have found that more than 58,000 participants and their families trust PATH Intl. Here's why:

  • PATH Intl. Centers are recognized as valued partners by their clients
  • PATH Intl. Centers have the advice they need to be successful in their EAAT endeavors
  • PATH Intl., through its communications and website, drives people to centers

Whether you are considering starting a center or you want to offer participants a tested level of professionalism recognized internationally, PATH Intl. offers the information and community you need to achieve success. PATH Intl. is an international voice of the EAAT industry. As the leading organization advocating for EAAT and providing standards for safe and enabling equine interactions, PATH Intl. celebrates ability, optimism, diversity and a shared love of equines.

Five Reasons to Pursue PATH Intl. Center Membership

True Community - Your center will be in the company of truly dedicated professionals who can help you learn what is necessary to be successful, while attending to the safety and well-being of both clients and horses.

Recognition and Credibility - Clients and their families trust the PATH Intl. name. They knwo your program is guided by a PATH Intl. certified instructor and other professionals they can trust. They can trust your center to offer exceptional care and attention when providing services.

Useful benefits - From discounts on insurance and conferences; to helpful tools including access to Equestrian Professional; to information on best practices, access to fellow members, educational opportunities and the use of the PATH Intl. logo, PATH Intl. centers receive help and support on their way to success.

Special visibility - Clients look for EAAT member centers they can trust by going to the directory of centers on the PATH Intl. website. In addition, publications such as PATH Intl.'s Strides and participation in the various communities and special interest groups elevate the name and reputation of PATH Intl. centers throughout the EAAT industry.

Training and Education - Through the PATH Intl. Standards for Certification and Accreditation manual, which is updated and published annually, PATH Intl. instructors and other center personnel have an excellent resource with which to evaluate their work. In addition, PATH Intl. centers have access to volunteer training and are eligible for ongoing educational opportunities, which they learn about through PATH Intl. News, a monthly email publication.

Click here for information on how to start a PATH Intl. Center or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

horse-riding-treesThe benefits of animal-assisted activities and therapies have been recognized for a long time, but the specific benefits of interacting with horses may be less well known. Working with horses can have a major physical and emotional impact on people with a wide variety of issues and disabilities. Some (but not all) issues and disabilities for which equine-assisted activities and therapies (EAAT) are useful are listed with supporting evidence where available.

Amputations

People who have experienced an amputation can be successful riders and drivers. Many para-equestrians have successfully competed with an amputation.  Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.) centers are experienced in creating adaptations in equipment to accommodate for people with amputations of upper and lower extremities. Drivers can learn one-handed driving and compete in pleasure driving competitions.

Borges de Araujo, Araújo, Santana, Lopes & Franck (2006) studied the use of hippotherapy as a physical therapy strategy to improve postural steadiness in patients with lower limb amputations. Data were gathered using a platform sensor F-Mat connected to a computer before the first physical therapy session utilizing hippotherapy and after the 20th session. Results from the three participants indicated increased speed and distance post treatment.  

Attention Deficit Disorder

Children with attention deficit disorder (ADD) or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have difficulties with attention and self control of behavior. Horseback riding requires attention to the instructor and the horse. Children who participate in a riding program will be taught sequential steps for learning to control their horse and becoming more independent. Riding lessons can be modified in length to accommodate for decreased attention span in the beginning of the program. Children with ADD or ADHD may also benefit from participation in a vaulting program at a PATH Intl. center. Vaulting requires attention and timing for approaching the horse on the lunge line as well as mounting and dismounting. In vaulting, children work in groups requiring self control and team work.

Autism

Children and adults with autism participate in a variety of PATH Intl. center programs including riding, driving, vaulting, hippotherapy, and equine-facilitated psychotherapy (EFP).  Both equine-assisted activities such as riding or vaulting and equine-assisted therapy such as hippotherapy or psychotherapy can impact the life of a person with autism. 

Bass, Duchowny, and Llabre (2008) studied children with autism participating in a 12 week therapeutic horseback riding  program. Two instruments were used to measure social functioning before and after the intervention: the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) and the Sensory Profile (SP). They found the children with autism who participated in the therapeutic horseback riding program improved in sensory integration and directed attention as compared to the control group.

Macauley (2007) studied children with mild, moderate and severe autism participating in a 10 week speech therapy session using hippotherapy. The children were evaluated using the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS) as well as attention to task and number or session goals met. All children showed progress on at least one of the following four CARS subtests: relating to people, listening behaviors, verbal communication and nonverbal communication.

Brain Injuries

People with brain injuries can experience multiple symptoms related to their injury. They may participate in a variety of programs depending on their abilities and goals. People with a brain injury who are seeking to pursue a new recreational outlet may benefit from riding or driving programs. Participants develop skills needed to direct their equine partners through obstacles, cones courses, or on trail rides.

Cerebral Palsy

People of all ages with cerebral palsy may enjoy interacting with horses. Children can learn a sport such as riding to share with their peers. Adults may treasure riding as a life long leisure activity. Horseback riding requires skills including good posture, coordination, and balance to direct the horse. Riders with cerebral palsy may progress from riding with sidewalkers to riding independently.  Some people with cerebral palsy may prefer to learn carriage driving and may even be able to drive from their own wheelchair in a specially designed carriage.  

A large amount  of research in equine-assisted therapy has involved children with cerebral palsy.  Shurtleff, Standeven, & Engsberg (2009) measured head and trunk stability changes in children with cerebral palsy after 12 weeks of hippotherapy treatments provided by an occupational or physical therapist. The research team used a motorized barrel and video motion capture to challenge and measure the changes in motor control. The children showed very significant improvements in control of their trunks and heads at the end of the intervention period and maintained improvements after a 12 week period without treatment.

Cerebrovascular Accident/Stroke 

 People who have experienced a cerebrovascular accident (CVA) or stroke may experience challenges from deficits resulting from the area of the brain affected by the stroke. Examples of deficits include loss of the use of a limb such as an arm/hand, difficulty finding or understanding words, or  balance problems. PATH Intl. centers offer a variety of programs to work with these challenges and those who have had a CVA may benefit from an enjoyable physical activity involving horses. They can learn to ride or drive with one hand or may use an adapted rein on their weaker side. Riding in a group is a great shared social experience as well as opportunity to interact with horses.

Deafness

People who are deaf or hard of hearing may experience improved self-esteem and a sense of independence and empowerment by becoming an independent equestrian. People with hearing impairments will develop unique ways to communicate with their instructor and equine partner while learning riding or driving. 

Developmental Delay/Cognitive Delay

PATH Intl. centers are able to provide a variety of recreational programs that reflect personal preferences and choices for the person with developmental delays. Learning horseback riding skills includes leisure and recreational activities alone and with others, riding socially with others, taking turns, extending the time of the riding lesson and expanding one's repertoire of skills towards independent riding. Some persons may choose to compete in programs such as the Special Olympics.

Down Syndrome

Children and adults with Down syndrome may participate in equine-assisted activities or equine-assisted therapy if atlantioaxial instability (AAI) has been ruled out with current x-rays and/or the participant has no signs or symptoms of this condition per their physician.  

Champagne and Dugas (2010) provided 11 weeks of hippotherapy to two children with Down Syndrome and measured changes in postural control.  The Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) and accelerometry were the instruments used to measure. Improvements in gross motor behavior (particularly walking, running, and jumping) were revealed by the GMFM. The overall accelerometry data demonstrated interesting adaptive responses to the postural challenges induced by the horse.

Emotional Disabilities

Many people with emotional disabilities are able to enjoy equine based programs that promote physical activity and social interaction. PATH Intl. programs are designed for safety and close supervision as well as fun, interesting activities.

Learning Disabilities

Participants in a PATH Intl. program are presented information about riding and driving skills and horsemanship in a variety of methods.  People with learning disabilities have the chance to learn through visual, auditory, and kinesthetic methods while learning to ride or drive a horse. They may be motivated to learn more about horses then they are in their school classroom. The horse’s response to the aids given by the rider or driver is natural positive reinforcement and helps participants build skills.  

Multiple Sclerosis

Therapeutic riding can be a great source of exercise in which people with multiple sclerosis may choose to participate. They can participate in riding within their limits of strength and energy and still enjoy an active recreational activity or sport.  Riding may help people with multiple sclerosis stay limber and active.

Silkwood-Sherer and Warmbier (2007) studied the effects of hippotherapy on postural stability in persons with multiple sclerosis. They found that the group receiving hippotherapy (9 adults) demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in balance as measured by the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and Tinetti Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment (POMA) following 7 weeks of hippotherapy intervention. The comparison group consisting of 6 adults showed no improvement in balance. A between group difference in the BBS scores by 14 weeks was noted, thus suggesting that improvements in the intervention group may have been caused by the hippotherapy treatments. None of the subjects in either the intervention or comparison groups participated in other forms of rehabilitation during the study.  

Muscular Dystrophy

People with muscular dystrophy may participate in programs at PATH Intl. centers to keep active while engaging in an enjoyable activity. Riders may start out more independent, but may need more support as their disease progresses. Riding lessons may be tailored to the abilities and stamina of the rider. The PATH Intl. instructor may support their transition to a non-mounted program such as driving or a hippotherapy program as their needs change. This flexibility helps the person with muscular dystrophy stay active and engaged while coping with changes in their abilities.

Spina Bifida

Participants with spina bifida may participate in equine-assisted activities or therapies at a PATH Intl. center.  Prior to participation, the client’s doctor will need to carefully screen the participant for concerns such as tethered cord, hydromyelia or Chiari II malformation. Any changes in neurological status must be carefully monitored during participation in riding programs. Learning to ride or a horse may be an empowering experience and allow someone with limited mobility from spina bifida to experience a greater freedom on the back of a horse.

Spinal Cord Injuries

People who have had a spinal cord injury may have varied levels of impairments from sensory loss to quadriplegia. A complete spinal cord injury above T-6 is a contraindication for riding, but would not necessarily prevent a client’s participation in other types of equine programs such as driving and unmounted activities. Many people who have had a spinal cord injury may participate in therapeutic riding lessons, carriage driving or may choose an equine-assisted therapy program to address challenges with trunk control or coping with their injury.  

Lechner, Kakebeeke, Hegemann, and Baumberger (2007) conducted research to determine the effect of hippotherapy on spasticity and mental well-being of persons with spinal cord injury (SCI).Spasticity was measured by the Ashworth Scale and subjects’ self-rating on a visual analogue scale. Well-being was measured by subjects’ self-report on the well-being scale Befindlichkeits-Skala of von Zerssen. The  researchers found that only the effect of hippotherapy reached significance for clinically rated spasticity compared with the control condition (without intervention). Immediate improvements in the subjects’ mental well-being were detected only after hippotherapy.

Visual Impairment

People who have a visual impairment are able to learn to ride or drive independently and compete in equestrian events. People with visual impairments may participate as part of a vaulting team. Strategies to help people with visual impairments include use of intercom systems with the instructors, learning to count steps/strides, or auditory markers in the arena. These strategies are frequently used at PATH Intl. centers and both instructors and horses are able to accommodate and accept the rider or driver’s differences.  

References

Bass, M. M., Duchowny, C. A., & Llabre, M. M. (2009). The effect of therapeutic horseback riding on social functioning in children with autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 39(9), 1261-1267. doi:10.1007/s10803-009-0734-3 (published single research study)

Borges de Araujo, T., Araújo, R., Santana, L. A., Lopes, M., & Franck, C. R. (2006). Use of hippotherapy as physiotherapy strategy treatment in improvement for postural steadiness in patient with lower limb amputated: A pilot study. Paper presented at the 12th International Congress of Therapeutic Riding, Brazil. Paper retrieved from  http://www.ncpg-kenniscentrum.nl/documenten/twaalfdeintcongresfrdi.pdf (oral presentation of single research project)

Champagne, D., & Dugas, C. (2010). Improving gross motor function and postural control with hippotherapy in children with Down syndrome: Case reports. Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, 26(8), 564-571. (published descriptive report)  

Lechner, H. E.,  Kakebeeke, T. H.,  Hegemann, D., & Baumberger, M. (2007). The effect of hippotherapy on spasticity and on mental well-being of persons with spinal cord injury. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 88(10), 1241-1248. doi:10.1016/j.apmr.2007.07.015 (published single research study)

Macauley, B. (2007, April). Effects of equine movement on attention and communication in children with autism. Paper presented at the meeting of the American Hippotherapy Association, Atlanta, Georgia. (oral presentation of single research project)

Shurtleff, T. L., Standeven, J. W., & Engsberg, J. R. (2009). Changes in dynamic trunk/head stability and functional reach after hippotherapy. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 90, 1185-1195. doi:10.1016/j.apmr.2009.01.026 (published single research study)

Silkwood-Sherer, D., & Warmbier, H. (2007). Effects of hippotherapy on postural stability, in persons with Multiple Sclerosis: A pilot study. Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy, 31(2), 77-84. doi:10.1097/NPT.0b013e31806769f7 (published single research study)

Note: Following each reference citation is the type of evidence. In this set of references, the highest type of evidence is a published single research study, followed by a published descriptive report, and then an oral presentation of a single research project. Type of evidence is important and is a factor for consideration for evidence-based practice.


Revised October 2011 by Health & Ed Advisory

 

Equine-Assisted Activities (EAA)

Equine-assisted activities are any specific center activity, e.g.. therapeutic riding, mounted or ground activities, grooming and stable management, shows, parades, demonstrations, etc., in which the center’s clients, participants, volunteers, instructors and equines are involved.

Equine-Assisted Therapy (EAT)

Equine-assisted therapy is treatment that incorporates equine activities and/or the equine environment. Rehabilitative goals are related to the patient’s needs and the medical professional’s standards of practice.

Equine-Assisted Learning (EAL)

Equine-assisted learning (EAL) is an experiential learning approach that promotes the development of life skills for eductional, professional and personal goals through equine-assisted activities. PATH Intl. provides standards of professionalism and safety for people workin in the EAAT field and guidelines for those providing EAL.

Click here to read the EAL Guidelines.

Equine-Facilitated Psychotherapy (EFP)

EFP is defined as an interactive process in which a licensed mental health professional working with or as an appropriately credentialed equine professional, partners with suitable equine(s) to address psychotherapy goals set forth by the mental health professional and the client.

Click here to read the EFP Guidelines. (Section J-5. Note: You will need to be logged in to access the PATH Intl. Standards for Certification and Accreditation.)

Hippotherapy

The American Hippotherapy Association, Inc., defines hippotherapy as a physical, occupational or speech therapy treatment strategy that utilizes equine movement. The word hippotherapy derives from the Greek word hippos, meaning horse. The term hippotherapy refers to the use of the movement of the horse as a treatment strategy by physical therapists, occupational therapists and speech/language pathologists to address impairments, functional limitations and disabilities in patients with neuromotor and sensory dysfunction. This treatment strategy is used as part of an integrated treatment program to achieve functional goals.

Interactive Vaulting

Interactive Vaulting is an activity in which the students perform movements on and around the horse. These movements can be very simple such as sitting without holding onto the surcingle or a more elaborate vaulting position move such as kneeling or standing on the horse. It all depends on the individual needs of the vaulter. Learn more.

Therapeutic Driving

Carriage Driving offers students with physical, mental, sensory or emotional disabilities the rewards of interaction and control of a horse or pony while driving from a carriage seat or in their own wheelchair in a carriage modified to accommodate their wheelchair. Learn more.

Therapeutic Riding

Therapeutic riding is an equine-assisted activity for the purpose of contributing positively to the cognitive, physical, emotional and social well-being of individuals with special needs. Learn more.

PATH-Intl-Heroes-RGB-web-sm“Appreciating the power of the horse to change lives is our goal,” said Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH International) Past President Dr. Paul Spiers, “and PATH International wants to provide positive change for these very special lives. Our service personnel have fought to preserve our freedom, and, for many, at a very dear cost. We must be certain that if our wounded service personnel and veterans need and want this kind of help, they will get the best PATH International has to offer.” 

PATH International Equine Services for Heroes® Mission

PATH International Equine Services for Heroes® assists military veterans through services provided by PATH International members and by providing leadership and guidance for equine assisted activities and therapies.

To accomplish this mission, PATH International centers connect with Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers and Clinics, as well as individual veterans. Veterans of any age can benefit from the program and by being involved with equines.

Find PATH International Centers offering Equine Services for Heroes

Learn about Equine-Assisted Learning

The Wounded Warrior Project, Inc. Scholarship Program Is Still Open!

The Wounded Warrior Project, Inc. has a direct service program that specifically pays for qualified veterans to have sessions at PATH Intl. Premier Accredited Centers. Each veteran who qualifies is gifted 10 one-hour sessions at $75 each, so Premier Accredited Centers can earn up to $750 per warrior. The program is open enrollment, and requires an agreement to be filled out and signed. To find out if your center qualifies for the WWP, Inc. program, contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

Support PATH International Equine Services for Heroes®

horse and rider with sidewalkerThank you for your interest in supporting PATH International Equine Services for Heroes®. We appreciate your desire to help our veterans. Please help PATH International further fund and develop this program by making a contribution. We invite you to make an online contribution to PATH International Equine Services for Heroes. To mail a donation or to make a donation via telephone, please use the contact information below:

PATH International Equine Services for Heroes
PO Box 33150
Denver, CO 80233

Related Links

Read past articles and stories about PATH International Equine Serivces for Heroes

Find PATH International Centers offering Equine Services for Heroes

Join the PATH International Equine Services for Heroes Community Connections Group. Check us out for information on what's happening in the community.

Start a PATH International Equine Services for Heroes program at your center

PATH International Equine Services for Heroes Logo

If you need a logo, please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with your request.

Resources for Veterans

Explore VA provides resources for Veterans and their families interested in learning about and applying for disability compensation benefits, including benefit eligibility, the application process, benefits ratings and rates, and spouse and dependents' compensation eligibility.

horse-boy-laughingWhat Are Equine-Assisted Activities and Therapies?

Throughout the world, hundreds of thousands of individuals with and without special needs experience the rewarding benefits of equine-assisted activities and therapies (EAAT). A physical, cognitive or emotional special need does not limit a person from interacting with horses. In fact, such interactions can prove highly rewarding. For instance, experiencing the rhythmic motion of a horse can be very beneficial. Riding a horse moves the rider's body in a manner similar to a human gait, so riders with physical needs often show improvement in flexibility, balance and muscle strength.

Whether it's a five-year-old with Down syndrome, a 45-year-old recovering from a spinal cord injury, a senior citizen recovering from a stroke or a teenager struggling with depression, research shows that individuals of all ages who participate in EAAT can experience physical and emotional rewards. For individuals with emotional challenges, the unique relationship formed with the horse can lead to increased confidence, patience and self-esteem. For teams in the corporate workplace and any individual seeking better leadership, team building or communication skills, working with horses provides a powerful new paradigm.

PATH Intl. is an international voice of the EAAT industry. As the premier professional membership organization, PATH Intl. advocates for EAAT and provides standards for safe and ethical equine interaction, through education, communication, standards and research.

Download the current Fact Sheet (2017).

The Role of the Equine as Partner in EAAT

New scientific research continues to reveal critical information about equine sentience- their abilities of perception, cognition, memory, and emotions such as pain and fear. Equines are able to perceive, respond to and learn from the impressions they receive from minimal sensory stimuli. The stimulus may originate from changes in human biochemistry, body language, or vocal intonations. It can also come from changes in the equine’s environment, relationships with other equines, or the equine’s general health In this way, equines make decisions based upon the stimuli they experience from others or from their environment (Hangg, 2005; Nicol, 2002; Proops, McComb, &  Reby, 2009; Saslow, 2002). These abilities are based in natural, biological, physiological, and psychological traits of equines. Each equine is unique in personality, and has individual likes, dislikes and habits. The information gained from equine communication can be highly useful in all EAAT settings. Listening to equine communication can have an effect on the care of the equines, their rate of burnout, and the success of the human-equine interaction. In EAAT sessions or lessons, viewing the equine as a partner invites opportunities for relationship building and skill building with all participants served.

Testimonials

"I have multiple schlerosis, and horseback riding helps me overcome my day to day challenges more than anything else I could do." — Lori Hall, rider at Astride with Pride, a PATH Intl. Premier Accredited Center in Bedford, VA

"The horses were the bridge between father and child, creating a common bond upon which they could build."— Blair McKissock, MSEd, PATH Intl. Certified Registered Level Instructor

"Parents watch their children take risks, meet challenges and become independent."— Meggan Hill-McQueeney, PATH Intl. Certified Master Level Instructor

Get Involved 

Want to really learn about EAAT? Get involved.

One way to get involved is to become a volunteer. Learn how here.

Learn More About ...

EAAT Definitions
Benefits of EAAT
Resources for Special Educators

Specialty Disciplines
Therapeutic Riding
Therapeutic Driving
Interactive Vaulting
Hippotherapy
PATH International Equine Services for Heroes
Equine-Facilitated Psychotherapy
Equine-Assisted Learning

Joining an Email Group

regionmapAn email group is a service provided by a third party that allows people with similar interests to communicate easily through email or web postings. The Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.) does not monitor or supervise any email groups; however below are the communities hosted by PATH Intl. through Community Connections.

Check out PATH Intl. Community Connections Regional Groups for information about what’s happening in your region.

 

Below are the Community Connections communities. In order to have access to the files, message archives and other features of the community, you will need to join the community. To join, make sure you are logged in, then click on the link to go directly to that particular community.

Region 1 This community is for the members of PATH Intl. Region 1
Region 2
This community is for the members of PATH Intl. Region 2
Region 3
This community is for the members of PATH Intl. Region 3
Region 4
This community is for the members of PATH Intl. Region 4
Region 5 This community is for the members of PATH Intl. Region 5
Region 6
This community is for the members of PATH Intl. Region 6
Region 7
This community is for the members of PATH Intl. Region 7
Region 8 This community is for the members of PATH Intl. Region 8
Region 9
This community is for the members of PATH Intl. Region 9
Region 10 This community is for the members of PATH Intl. Region 10
Region 11
This community is for the members of PATH Intl. Region 11
Administrator  
Driving  
EF Learning  
EF Psychotherapy For practitioners in the field of EFP to discuss methodologies, theories, research, client populations, treatment modalities, and more as well as networking with other professionals.
Equine Services for Heroes A resource for everyone at PATH Intl. who is working with veterans, military personnel and their families. Post your questions, comments, ideas, resources, things that worked and things that didn't work, and help us to more effectively serve those who have so selflessly served our country. 
Equine Welfare This community provides a voice and dialogue on best practices for equine care and welfare.
Higher Ed This community group supports members working within institutions of higher education or programs and members working at centers who partner with institutions of higher education.
Instructor  
Interactive Vaulting  
International This community group is designed to support and connect our international membership as well as any members who are interested in international issues and topics relevent to EAAT.
Marketing Subgroup This subgroup will provide valuable marketing support for PATH Intl. centers.

 

As you pursue Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.) certification at any level or in any discipline, PATH Intl. recommends reviewing the certification booklet for the appropriate discipline. These booklets will tell you step-by-step how to become a PATH Intl. certified instructor and outline all the important deadlines. (Links to the application booklets are found at the bottom of each instructor certification category, e.g. Riding, Driving, Vaulting)

PATH Intl. appreciates the commitment made when someone applies for the certification process in any area at any level.  The financial resources and the time needed to complete the educational requirements, the practical demonstrations and to build up a basic level of horsemanship skills reflect a dedication to service of some very special individuals. As a professional certification, candidates should expect to invest a significant amount of time in teaching, online courses and preparing for the certification itself.  Given the number of participants on waiting lists at PATH Intl. centers there is a need for PATH Intl. certified instructors.  The members and staff of the association support all candidates as they navigate this challenging process and wish them success.  

Keep in mind that candidates will most likely have travel costs since the association can make no guarantee as to when and where certifications will take place.  PATH Intl. centers host and manage the workshops and certifications.  It is the continuing investment of these centers in organizing the certifications that enables the industry and PATH Intl. to continue to grow its instructor ranks. Candidates should check the PATH Intl. website regularly for upcoming certifications that fit in to their schedule and should plan for travel expenses accordingly.   

The PATH Intl. office is here to support you if you should need anything throughout this process. Please feel free to give us a call.

horse-run-vaultWe are excited to announce that the Equine Welfare (formerly Equine Advocacy) task force has been reactivated. The goal of the task force is to strengthen the care and welfare of horses in PATH Intl. centers through the education of instructors, volunteers, center administrators and equine professionals.

The task force will be developing recommendations, proposals and/or standards to submit to the oversight committees for review and the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.) Board of Trustees for approval, focusing on opportunities to further educate the EAAT industry.

Missing any articles from PATH Intl. eNews about equine welfare? You can find them in the PATH Intl. eNews archive or on the equine tips page.

Click here to read Best Practices for Equines in Therapeutic Horsemanship Programs

As part of Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.)’s educational goals, PATH Intl. publishes and distributes several different industry-specific newsletters and magazines. Each of these publications feature contributions from both PATH Intl. staff and member volunteers, and are available to our members as a member benefit in both print and electronic form. PATH Intl.’s publications keep our members updated on the most current developments in the field of EAAT, offer advice and ideas from other members, and address issues relevant to EAAT providers and center administrators.

Note: All current publications are located on the My PATH Intl. Membership page. You must be logged in to view any current publication. The links below will take you to the archives for that publication.

strides magazinePATH Intl.’s major publication is a full-color, quarterly magazine titled PATH Intl. Strides (formerly NARHA's Strides), which features a different theme or topic each issue pertaining to our members and the world of EAAT.

PATH Intl. also sends out a twice-monthly electronic newsletter titled PATH Intl. eNews (formerly NARHA News), which covers news and issues within the organization.

Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.) publishes a twice-monthly newsletter, educational materials and a quarterly magazine called PATH Intl. Strides (formerly NARHA Strides). From these publications, we offer a variety of helpful articles written by industry experts. In this section, learn more about:

 

Industry Links

AHAlogo-smAmerican Hippotherapy Association - promotes the use of the movement of the horse as a treatment strategy in physical, occupational and speech-language therapy sessions for people living with disabilities
 

HandH_smHorses & Humans Research Foundation - facilitates universal understanding and appreciation of the significant influence of horses on humans.

ELCR_NL_banner_sm

Equine Land Conservation Resource - The Equine Land conservation Resource works with individuals, equestrian and conservation organizations and equine-based corporations to save land for horses and preserve our industry and way of life.

UnwantedHorse_smUnwanted Horse Coalition - to reduce the number of unwanted horses and to improve their welfare through education and the efforts of organizations committed to the health, safety, and responsible care and disposition of these horses.

 

HETIHETI (formerly known as the Federation of Riding for the Disabled International) is a global organization that forms worldwide links between countries, centers and individuals offering equine facilitated activities and assists in the development of new programs worldwide.

equisearchEquiSearch.com works closely with award-winning equine magazines to deliver the content horse owners care about: tips on riding and training, authoritative information on horse care, the latest horse sports and industry news, plus sweepstakes and active online forums.

chaCertified Horsemanship Association - To promote excellence in safety and education for the benefit of the entire horse industry. This is accomplished by certifying instructors, accrediting equine facilities and publishing educational resources. dsicover_horses_logo

DiscoverHorses.com  introduces people to the wonderful world of horses and encourages them to become involved. The site is the product of a unique partnership of the Equine Network, American Quarter Horse Association, United States Equestrian Federation and the Kentucky Horse Park.

 

 

Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.) offers a variety of educational workshops to help members expand their knowledge, learn new skills, refine their instruction methods, stay up-to-date on industry practices and prepare for instructor certifications. These workshops, which are held at PATH Intl. Centers and facilitated by specially trained faculty, include the Registered Instructor Workshop, Equine Specialist in Mental Health and Learning Workshop, Driving Workshop and Interactive Vaulting Workshop and Mentor Training Workshop.

The Registered Instructor Workshop is a two-and-a-half day workshop that provides an overview of best practices in therapeutic riding, allowing attendees to learn more about therapeutic riding concepts and PATH Intl. This workshop is designed to prepare individuals to provide safe, effective therapeutic riding lessons to individuals with disabilities. The workshop curriculum includes hands-on and classroom activities on developing lesson plans with measurable objectives and related activities; propr tack and equipment use; mounting and dismounting considerations; techniques for effectively instructing individuals with various disabilities; volunteer management; general teaching techniques and hands-on demo lessons. Attendance at this workshop is a prerequisite to attain PATH Intl. Registered Instructor Certification. Learn more by visiting the therapeutic riding instructor certification webpage

The Equine Specialist Workshop is a three-day workshop designed to provide equine professionals and therapeutic riding instructors with tools for working with students with mental health and/or learning issues, and collaborate with mental health and/or educational professionals to provide a more comprehensive experience for clients. The faculty for each workshop includes an equine professional and a mental health professional. Workshops are most commonly delivered along with Horsemanship Skills Test event evaluated by trained evaluators. The workshop and skills test are the first two prerequisites toward obtaining Equine Specialist in Mental Health and Learning certification. Learn more by visiting the Equine Specialist in Mental Health and Learning certification webpage.

driving-horseThe Driving Workshop is an intensive three-day workshop designed to present the basics of becoming a driving instructor delivered by faculty with over 1,000 hours of experience driving and instructing individuals with disabilities. Practice driving, rein and whip handling, ground driving, harnessing and putting-to are all included via hands-on activities and/or demonstrations performed by the faculty. Attendees should be prepared to actively participate and be on their feet for much of the workshop. Attendees will also learn how to develop creative lesson plans with measurable objectives, progress student skills and choose appropriate activities for various populations. Training and selection of therapeutic driving horses will be discussed in addition to preferred conformation and temperament. Examples of various therapeutic driving equines and vehicles will be available. This workshop is a prerequisite to attain PATH Intl. Driving Instructor Certification. Learn more by visiting the Driving Certification webpage.

horse-run-vaultThe Interactive Vaulting Workshop led by trained PATH Intl. interactive vaulting faculty guides attendees through the basics of interactive vaulting. Activities include proper lungeing technique and appropriate tack, ground exercises, barrel work and group oriented activities both on and off the horse. Daily interactive vaulting sessions led by the workshop faculty provide examples of therapeutic interactive vaulting lessons as well as an opportunity for the participants to experience interactive vaulting for themselves. Student groups may also be brought in for demonstration. Come prepared to be active as participants learn a variety of activities to promote interaction, creativity, awareness and memory, and incorporate these into lesson planning and development. Basic vaulting movements will be taught with an emphasis on safety, spotting and determining when a student is ready to attempt movements on a moving horse. Training and selection of the interactive vaulting horse will be discussed. Interactive activities occur on, around and off the horse and barrel, with opportunities for feedback during all practice. This workshop is a requirement for the PATH Intl. Interactive Vaulting Instructor Certification. Learn more by visiting the Interactive Vaulting Certification webpage.

The Mentor Training Workshop was created in response to the need for a more formalized education process to produce qualified mentors for instructor candidates working toward PATH Intl. certification. Through group activities and discussion of scenarios, attendees will enhance their personal observation, evaluation and feedback skills. This workshop can be used for continuing education hours for PATH Intl. Certified Instructors. See the mentor training page for more information.

As international interest in PATH Intl. continues to grow, and the numbers of requests for workshops to be held in countries outside of the United States are increasing, PATH Intl. feels it is important to assume a “proactive” position in regards to international expansion and use of PATH Intl.’s standards. PATH Intl. is excited about these new opportunities to share knowledge about the benefits of equine-assisted activities and therapies around the world, and would like to make sure PATH Intl.’s standards for safety and effectiveness are implemented in a positive and consistent manner around the world. To promote international expansion, PATH Intl. has developed a checklist to guide international centers in hosting PATH Intl. workshops and certifications. This international checklist outlines a step-by-step process and list of considerations for hosting PATH Intl. events, and the PATH Intl. staff is always available for assistance and support. The PATH Intl. staff is working hard to make sure that, as the organization and our programs grow, we maintain the same high standards you’ve come to expect from PATH Intl.. If you have any questions please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. at extension 114.

Please visit the PATH Intl. Events Calendar for workshop dates.

Faculty

Click here for PATH Intl. Faculty

horse-kidsThe Equine Specialist workshop is a three-day workshop offered to equine professionals and therapeutic riding instructors who work or would like to work with students with mental health and/or learning issues. The workshop also benefits those who work with mental health or education professionals, helping to enhance cooperation and provide a more complete experience.

This workshop will give an overview of Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.) standards and core values, and provide overviews of EFL and EFP programs and examples of what EFL or EFP sessions will look like. In addition, ES workshops will detail the role the equine specialist is meant to play in a session, offer lesson roleplays and hands-on experience, and discuss the therapy and education teams and the importance of the equine professional’s role in maintaining the safety of all in the team – particularly the equine partner.

To find an Equine Specialist workshop, please see the PATH Intl. Events Calendar for dates and locations. Complete the application below and send it to the specific host center facilitating the workshop you wish to attend.

Equine Specialists should be able to:

  • Create and maintain a therapeutic and educational environment for all participants.
  • Understand how to maintain PATH Intl./EFMHA standards, including the care, management and humane treatment of the equine.
  • Ensure the safety and well-being of all equines participating in EFL/EFP sessions, and serve as the equine expert during all equine/human interactions.
  • Collaborate with all members of the team (mental health professionals, educators, volunteers and equines) to meet the goals of the client’s treatment plan or individual education plan.
  • Assist in designing appropriate exercises for clients based on their IEP or mental health treatment plan.

Independent Mental Health or Educator Certifications: visit www.cbeip.org

Equine Specialist in Mental Health and Learning Certification Booklet

Questions?

Visit the Equine Specialist in Mental Health and Learning FAQ page.

Register or Host a Workshop

Please see the PATH Intl. Events Calendar for dates and locations for equine specialist workshops.

Faculty

Click here for PATH Intl. Faculty

 

 

The Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.) values quality mentorship and believes it is instrumental to the success of instructor candidates completing any level or discipline of certification.

This workshop was created as a mentoring skill development program in response to the need for formalized education to enhance the skills of those mentoring instructor candidates. The mentor training can be completed as either an in-person or online course.

In order to supervise an instructor-in-training through the practice teaching hours required for certification eligibility, you must currently hold at least the level of certification the candidate is pursuing if not higher. You must also be an instructor in good standing at the time the hours are completed in order for the instructor candidate to receive credit for the hours. The mentor training is not required to supervise instructor candidates, though it is highly recommended to support candidate success rates. 

If you are a PATH Intl. certified instructor in good standing and complete the mentor training, your name may be added to the online list of PATH Intl. Mentors. Certification candidates and/or mentors in training use this online list to locate mentors who have completed the mentor training. To be added to the online mentor list, plese submit a copy of your mentor training certificate of completion to the PATH Intl. office. Upon receipt, you will receive a mentor bio form with your contact information to be posted online. 

The mentor training is available to anyone who would like to take it; you simply have to be a PATH Intl. member. The training can be highly beneficial for program directors in order to begin or enhance a mentor program at their center. Mentor programs can be used as a source of income for your center.

All participants who attend mentor training will be signed up for the PATH Intl. online Standards Course and Instructor Self-Study exam so they are aware of the current exams instructors-in-training are required to complete. No specific score is required to complete the mentoring training.  

Please visit the PATH Intl. Events Calendar to identify mentoring training opportunities, both online and in person.

Disclaimer: It is the responsibility of course participants/mentors to maintain documentation and supply proof of their mentor training course certificate of completion. PATH Intl. does not retain copies of certificates of completion issued for any PATH Intl. workshops or trainings.

 

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Therapeutic RidingTherapeutic DrivingInteractive VaultingEquine Services for HeroesEFP-EFL

Additional Sponsors

AdequanEQUUS FoundationMarkel Insurance CompanyCavalloRIDE TV